Presentation Title

Keynote - Branching Out: Forests from the Canopy Perspective

Presenter(s) Information

Nalini Nadkarni, University of Utah

Streaming Media

Start Date

1-3-2021 1:15 PM

End Date

1-3-2021 2:00 PM

Abstract

Nalini Nadkarni discussed how she has integrated her research on the ecology of canopy-dwelling plants and animals in tropical and temperate rainforests with diverse ways of engaging humans with the natural world. Her three decades of treetop research on four continents document the critical roles of canopy-dwelling biota in ecosystem processes. Her deep interest in raising awareness about the importance of trees to people has led her to develop novel ways to share knowledge with a wide range of public groups, including urban youth, artists, rap singers, faith-based groups, and people who are incarcerated. She offers insights on how ecologists of all kinds can – and should -- interweave their research to make the scientific enterprise more inclusive for and responsive to elements of society that have been underserved by science or who lack access to nature. Finally, she discussed how understanding primary forests might advance the ways that people understand and value trees in urban environments.

Subjects

Environmental education, Environmental social sciences, Plant ecology

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35504

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Mar 1st, 1:15 PM Mar 1st, 2:00 PM

Keynote - Branching Out: Forests from the Canopy Perspective

Nalini Nadkarni discussed how she has integrated her research on the ecology of canopy-dwelling plants and animals in tropical and temperate rainforests with diverse ways of engaging humans with the natural world. Her three decades of treetop research on four continents document the critical roles of canopy-dwelling biota in ecosystem processes. Her deep interest in raising awareness about the importance of trees to people has led her to develop novel ways to share knowledge with a wide range of public groups, including urban youth, artists, rap singers, faith-based groups, and people who are incarcerated. She offers insights on how ecologists of all kinds can – and should -- interweave their research to make the scientific enterprise more inclusive for and responsive to elements of society that have been underserved by science or who lack access to nature. Finally, she discussed how understanding primary forests might advance the ways that people understand and value trees in urban environments.