Presentation Title

Urban Stream Uplift and Connectivity in Fanno Creek

Presenter(s) Information

Matt Brennan, Clean Water ServicesFollow

Streaming Media

Start Date

2-3-2021 9:30 AM

End Date

2-3-2021 9:40 AM

Abstract

Urban streams often present limited opportunities for ecological uplift and connectivity. Infrastructure and social constraints can lead to smaller, disconnected projects with little room for change. Recent ecological improvements at Fanno Creek in Beaverton are the latest in a series of projects that are creating a more connected system from disjointed parts.

The Fanno Creek project has been a collaboration between Clean Water Services and Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District for both trail (replacement of undersized culverts with a timber bridge) and ecological improvements in an urban natural area. A 1000 foot reach of Fanno Creek was realigned, and the floodplain was graded to provide secondary channels and complex wetland environments. Large wood was utilized to roughen stream banks and bed and to provide habitat in floodplain wetlands.

The constructed ecological enhancements at the Fanno project encompass approximately 7 acres in a larger, 22 acre revegetation site that extends 3/4 mile from SW Denney Road to SW Hall Boulevard. Immediately downstream of SW Hall Boulevard, the Fanno Creek corridor has been enhanced for over 2 additional miles, linking both recent and older ecological enhancement projects implemented by regional partners. Systematic and intentional revegetation has created an ecological linkage and accelerant between sites and through this corridor. Coupling revegetation with strategic replacement of constricting structures within the corridor has allowed for at improved human access to these natural areas while improving the aquatic-riparian interface.

Subjects

Habitat restoration

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35494

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Mar 2nd, 9:30 AM Mar 2nd, 9:40 AM

Urban Stream Uplift and Connectivity in Fanno Creek

Urban streams often present limited opportunities for ecological uplift and connectivity. Infrastructure and social constraints can lead to smaller, disconnected projects with little room for change. Recent ecological improvements at Fanno Creek in Beaverton are the latest in a series of projects that are creating a more connected system from disjointed parts.

The Fanno Creek project has been a collaboration between Clean Water Services and Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District for both trail (replacement of undersized culverts with a timber bridge) and ecological improvements in an urban natural area. A 1000 foot reach of Fanno Creek was realigned, and the floodplain was graded to provide secondary channels and complex wetland environments. Large wood was utilized to roughen stream banks and bed and to provide habitat in floodplain wetlands.

The constructed ecological enhancements at the Fanno project encompass approximately 7 acres in a larger, 22 acre revegetation site that extends 3/4 mile from SW Denney Road to SW Hall Boulevard. Immediately downstream of SW Hall Boulevard, the Fanno Creek corridor has been enhanced for over 2 additional miles, linking both recent and older ecological enhancement projects implemented by regional partners. Systematic and intentional revegetation has created an ecological linkage and accelerant between sites and through this corridor. Coupling revegetation with strategic replacement of constricting structures within the corridor has allowed for at improved human access to these natural areas while improving the aquatic-riparian interface.