Presenter(s) Information

Adrienne St. Clair, MetroFollow

Streaming Media

Start Date

2-3-2021 9:40 AM

End Date

2-3-2021 9:50 AM

Abstract

While it is commonly understood that diverse genetics in plant populations assist with ecological or species recovery, genetic theory is difficult to distill into concrete decisions for action. An approach called Regional Admixture Provenance mixes seeds from multiple populations within the same geographic region and has been suggested as one method for establishing genetically diverse populations. However, few studies have examined this technique empirically to see how established populations compare to source populations and target outcomes. We used neutral genetic markers to follow genetic diversity through the production of golden paintbrush (Castilleja levisecta) for reintroduction. We tracked diversity from wild-collected source populations, through different production approaches, and into reintroduction. We found that measures of genetic diversity changed during production and that the step at which seed sources were combined affected how populations were represented in final reintroduction sites. We provide suggestions for best management techniques when working with both rare and common species.

Subjects

Habitat restoration, Plant ecology

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35501

Share

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 9:40 AM Mar 2nd, 9:50 AM

Considerations When Mixing Source Populations for Plants in Restoration

While it is commonly understood that diverse genetics in plant populations assist with ecological or species recovery, genetic theory is difficult to distill into concrete decisions for action. An approach called Regional Admixture Provenance mixes seeds from multiple populations within the same geographic region and has been suggested as one method for establishing genetically diverse populations. However, few studies have examined this technique empirically to see how established populations compare to source populations and target outcomes. We used neutral genetic markers to follow genetic diversity through the production of golden paintbrush (Castilleja levisecta) for reintroduction. We tracked diversity from wild-collected source populations, through different production approaches, and into reintroduction. We found that measures of genetic diversity changed during production and that the step at which seed sources were combined affected how populations were represented in final reintroduction sites. We provide suggestions for best management techniques when working with both rare and common species.