Presenter(s) Information

Lea Wilson, City of PortlandFollow

Streaming Media

Start Date

1-3-2021 4:10 PM

End Date

1-3-2021 4:20 PM

Abstract

The Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii) presents a perplexing challenge for tree planting projects in urban areas of the Pacific Northwest. The charismatic evergreen is desirable for its environmental and aesthetic benefits and seeming tolerance of tough conditions. At the same time, survival of individual plants in planting projects is low. In January of 2017, we planted 144 Pacific madrone trees in Baltimore Woods, a restored urban natural area in North Portland. Plots were designed to test irrigation frequency, exposure to light, and size-at-planting on survival and growth. This work is intended to inform planting and establishment protocols that increase the survival of newly planted Pacific madrone trees. Here we share a summary of our findings following four years of establishment care.

Subjects

Habitat restoration, Land/watershed management, Plant ecology

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35495

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Mar 1st, 4:10 PM Mar 1st, 4:20 PM

Survival and growth of Pacific madrone following four years of establishment care

The Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii) presents a perplexing challenge for tree planting projects in urban areas of the Pacific Northwest. The charismatic evergreen is desirable for its environmental and aesthetic benefits and seeming tolerance of tough conditions. At the same time, survival of individual plants in planting projects is low. In January of 2017, we planted 144 Pacific madrone trees in Baltimore Woods, a restored urban natural area in North Portland. Plots were designed to test irrigation frequency, exposure to light, and size-at-planting on survival and growth. This work is intended to inform planting and establishment protocols that increase the survival of newly planted Pacific madrone trees. Here we share a summary of our findings following four years of establishment care.