Presenter(s) Information

Marissa Eckman, City of GreshamFollow

Streaming Media

Start Date

1-3-2021 4:20 PM

End Date

1-3-2021 4:30 PM

Abstract

Most of the natural ponds that amphibians need to survive in the Gresham area have historically been drained or filled in for agricultural or urban development. Newly constructed stormwater facilities have been attracting pond-breeding amphibians, but are these facilities good habitat or death traps? The City of Gresham re-surveyed ponds originally surveyed twelve years prior to see if frog populations are persisting in urban environments using constructed ponds. These surveys were performed using volunteers to increase levels of community engagement in the city. We found that all four native pond-breeding amphibians (Rana aurora, Pseudacris regilla, Ambystoma macrodactylum, Ambystoma gracile) are persisting in constructed stormwater ponds and most species present twelve years ago were still present in their respective ponds. We also found that recently constructed ponds had been colonized quickly. Our volunteers enjoyed the opportunity to get out into ponds during winter and the data we got in return was relatively reliable. In sum, data collected shows that constructed stormwater ponds can support populations through time, even populations of sensitive species, therefore, when designing, constructing, and maintaining stormwater ponds habitat values should be taken into consideration. Additionally, amphibian egg mass surveys are a great way to engage community members in science and local environment.

Subjects

Habitat assessment, Land/watershed management, Water quality

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35492

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Mar 1st, 4:20 PM Mar 1st, 4:30 PM

Sensitive amphibian populations persist through time using constructed stormwater ponds

Most of the natural ponds that amphibians need to survive in the Gresham area have historically been drained or filled in for agricultural or urban development. Newly constructed stormwater facilities have been attracting pond-breeding amphibians, but are these facilities good habitat or death traps? The City of Gresham re-surveyed ponds originally surveyed twelve years prior to see if frog populations are persisting in urban environments using constructed ponds. These surveys were performed using volunteers to increase levels of community engagement in the city. We found that all four native pond-breeding amphibians (Rana aurora, Pseudacris regilla, Ambystoma macrodactylum, Ambystoma gracile) are persisting in constructed stormwater ponds and most species present twelve years ago were still present in their respective ponds. We also found that recently constructed ponds had been colonized quickly. Our volunteers enjoyed the opportunity to get out into ponds during winter and the data we got in return was relatively reliable. In sum, data collected shows that constructed stormwater ponds can support populations through time, even populations of sensitive species, therefore, when designing, constructing, and maintaining stormwater ponds habitat values should be taken into consideration. Additionally, amphibian egg mass surveys are a great way to engage community members in science and local environment.