Presentation Title

Improving climate resiliency and management practices in conservation planning by developing a ‘climate lens’ at West Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

Start Date

8-3-2022 10:30 AM

End Date

8-3-2022 10:40 AM

Abstract

Since 1900, the Pacific Northwest of the United States has warmed almost 2°F. Alongside increasing temperatures, the region has experienced wildfires, droughts, decreasing snowpack, and rising sea levels, the results of human-induced climate change driven by increases in greenhouse gas emissions and land use changes. West Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District (“WMSWCD”) works to improve climate resiliency and action in their service area by accumulating climate change data on regional impacts, determining best management practices, collaborating with local partners, and gathering climate mitigation tools.

With the inevitability of a changing climate, it is critically important to incorporate a ‘climate lens’ into local conservation practices. WMSWCD has partnered with Portland State University’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions and Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program to develop a climate lens with resources that guide the promotion of resilient communities in the face of climate change. Focuses include forest health, wildfire risk, native plant populations, water resources, and invasive threats. Management practices include promoting soil health, sequestering carbon, and incorporating Indigenous knowledge. Useful tools include those for selecting seedlots and measuring carbon sinks.

In addition to previously mentioned impacts of climate change, the region will likely experience drier summers and increases in heat wave frequency and intensity. Soil moisture and water availability for agricultural crops are expected to decrease with an increased threat from pests, diseases, and weeds. Management practices such as resilient farming, cover cropping, wildfire risk reduction, and adaptive planting can be used to mitigate climate change through conservation efforts.

Subjects

Climate Change, Environmental education, Land/watershed management

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Mar 8th, 10:30 AM Mar 8th, 10:40 AM

Improving climate resiliency and management practices in conservation planning by developing a ‘climate lens’ at West Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District

Since 1900, the Pacific Northwest of the United States has warmed almost 2°F. Alongside increasing temperatures, the region has experienced wildfires, droughts, decreasing snowpack, and rising sea levels, the results of human-induced climate change driven by increases in greenhouse gas emissions and land use changes. West Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District (“WMSWCD”) works to improve climate resiliency and action in their service area by accumulating climate change data on regional impacts, determining best management practices, collaborating with local partners, and gathering climate mitigation tools.

With the inevitability of a changing climate, it is critically important to incorporate a ‘climate lens’ into local conservation practices. WMSWCD has partnered with Portland State University’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions and Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program to develop a climate lens with resources that guide the promotion of resilient communities in the face of climate change. Focuses include forest health, wildfire risk, native plant populations, water resources, and invasive threats. Management practices include promoting soil health, sequestering carbon, and incorporating Indigenous knowledge. Useful tools include those for selecting seedlots and measuring carbon sinks.

In addition to previously mentioned impacts of climate change, the region will likely experience drier summers and increases in heat wave frequency and intensity. Soil moisture and water availability for agricultural crops are expected to decrease with an increased threat from pests, diseases, and weeds. Management practices such as resilient farming, cover cropping, wildfire risk reduction, and adaptive planting can be used to mitigate climate change through conservation efforts.