Emerald Ash Borer: Our Community's First Response

Start Date

3-11-2024 10:10 AM

End Date

3-11-2024 10:19 AM

Abstract

When natural resource (NR) threats like Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) come to regions it is not uncommon for events to pass through underserved and vulnerable communities unbeknownst. For many communities, the lack of awareness is due to barriers like language access, non-prioritization of information sharing, or other life priorities. Before long, the impacts are realized with little understanding as to why or how, bringing greater disparity. Proactively working first with underserved and vulnerable communities helps dismantle barriers that delay awareness of threats like EAB and will empower people to prepare, respond, and build resiliency for future NR issues. One such community is Centro Cultural who has provided services and safe spaces for Latinos in Washington County for over 50 years. Centro also has several ash trees that provide great community value and losing these trees will have severe impacts on all who need Centro. To avoid severe impacts, Centro teamed up with Backyard Habitat Certification Program, Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District, and Oregon Department of Forestry to develop a 6-month paid work-learn experience for Centro’s Climate Youth Justice program. A series of workshops were developed to introduce EAB, inventory methods, and management strategies to students so they may have the tools to develop a management plan unique to the community’s view and needs. You will hear from the partners and students in hopes that their effort may serve as a framework for other NR professionals and underserved communities to come together and proactively address EAB and future threats.

Subjects

Animal ecology, Environmental education, Habitat assessment

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/41409

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Mar 11th, 10:10 AM Mar 11th, 10:19 AM

Emerald Ash Borer: Our Community's First Response

When natural resource (NR) threats like Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) come to regions it is not uncommon for events to pass through underserved and vulnerable communities unbeknownst. For many communities, the lack of awareness is due to barriers like language access, non-prioritization of information sharing, or other life priorities. Before long, the impacts are realized with little understanding as to why or how, bringing greater disparity. Proactively working first with underserved and vulnerable communities helps dismantle barriers that delay awareness of threats like EAB and will empower people to prepare, respond, and build resiliency for future NR issues. One such community is Centro Cultural who has provided services and safe spaces for Latinos in Washington County for over 50 years. Centro also has several ash trees that provide great community value and losing these trees will have severe impacts on all who need Centro. To avoid severe impacts, Centro teamed up with Backyard Habitat Certification Program, Tualatin Soil and Water Conservation District, and Oregon Department of Forestry to develop a 6-month paid work-learn experience for Centro’s Climate Youth Justice program. A series of workshops were developed to introduce EAB, inventory methods, and management strategies to students so they may have the tools to develop a management plan unique to the community’s view and needs. You will hear from the partners and students in hopes that their effort may serve as a framework for other NR professionals and underserved communities to come together and proactively address EAB and future threats.