Exploring the Layers of Science and Communities Impacted by Climate Change through the Lens of Tree Health

Start Date

3-11-2024 2:10 PM

End Date

3-11-2024 2:19 PM

Abstract

Communities of people, places, and organisms can often be defined by common characteristics and the sharing of interests. At Hoyt Arboretum Friends (HAF), different layers of communities are connecting to better understand climate change and its impact on a native tree species, the western redcedar.

In the fall of 2023, volunteers of HAF expanded their community science reach into the greater Portland area. In partnership with Western Redcedar Dieback project, HAF volunteers observed 100 individual trees to determine if a connection exists between western redcedar health and average annual temperature. To do so, western redcedar observations were overlaid with the heat map of Portland. These findings will be added to the spring 2024 lesson plan of a plant-based climate change program the HAF education team is piloting in partnership with the US Botanic Garden in Washington D.C.

Join this presentation to learn how layers of community are helping to tell a tree story and connect local young people to the natural world. This is just one example of how community science can go far beyond data collection. Explore with us how projects like this encourage communities to broaden their boundaries, develop and strengthen peoples’ connections to nature, and represent how science is constantly changing based on new findings and trends.

Subjects

Climate Change, Environmental education, Plant ecology

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/41415

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Mar 11th, 2:10 PM Mar 11th, 2:19 PM

Exploring the Layers of Science and Communities Impacted by Climate Change through the Lens of Tree Health

Communities of people, places, and organisms can often be defined by common characteristics and the sharing of interests. At Hoyt Arboretum Friends (HAF), different layers of communities are connecting to better understand climate change and its impact on a native tree species, the western redcedar.

In the fall of 2023, volunteers of HAF expanded their community science reach into the greater Portland area. In partnership with Western Redcedar Dieback project, HAF volunteers observed 100 individual trees to determine if a connection exists between western redcedar health and average annual temperature. To do so, western redcedar observations were overlaid with the heat map of Portland. These findings will be added to the spring 2024 lesson plan of a plant-based climate change program the HAF education team is piloting in partnership with the US Botanic Garden in Washington D.C.

Join this presentation to learn how layers of community are helping to tell a tree story and connect local young people to the natural world. This is just one example of how community science can go far beyond data collection. Explore with us how projects like this encourage communities to broaden their boundaries, develop and strengthen peoples’ connections to nature, and represent how science is constantly changing based on new findings and trends.