Document Type

Closed Project

Publication Date

Winter 2010

Instructor

Charles Weber

Course Title

Strategic Management of Technology

Course Number

EMGT 526/626

Subjects

Strategic planning, Technology -- Management, High technology industries -- Management, Competition, Technological innovations -- Economic aspects

Abstract

High technology firms compete fiercely for their share of wealth. Strategic Management is a discipline that determines a firm’s intent and direction for creating a competitive advantage and wealth. Often, strategies are set though polices that govern the firm’s products and services, how it positions itself to compete, the choice of scope and diversity to compete, as well as the administration polices used to define and coordinate work. Two prevailing economic theories that help explain how an economic phenomenon affects economic competition are Schumpeterian and Kirznerian. Both theories attempt to explain entrepreneurship and its effect on the economy.

Firms that are able to learn and exploit technological opportunities before their competitors position themselves with a competitive position, while reaping the profits. The theory of Absorptive Capacity is predicated on the firm’s ability to predict more accurately the nature of technological advances through the accumulation of the firm’s knowledge by recognizing the value of new external information, assimilating it, and exploiting it commercially. This paper discusses expanding the Absorptive Capacity model developed by Cohen and Levinthal to include technical regime incentives and dynamically model Schumpeterian and Kirznerian competition when assessing the firm’s strategic intent

Description

This project is only available to students, staff, and faculty of Portland State University

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/22959

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