Title

Delayed True Vocal Fold Closure During Compression Phase of Cough in Individuals with Unilateral Vocal Fold Immobility

Date

12-8-2020 9:50 AM

Abstract

The efficient movement of the true vocal folds (TVFs) is important for an effective cough. There are three phases in a cough: inspiration, compression, and expulsion (Hillel, 2001). The purpose of this pilot study was to determine patterns of TVF closure during the compression phase of volitional cough in individuals with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI) with simultaneous airflow measurement. Seven participants with UVFI (7 females ages 29-84 years) underwent simultaneous flexible laryngeal endoscopy and airflow examination. Laryngeal endoscopy and airflow measures were temporally synchronized with audio/video images of TVF movement via Video Capture in LabChart Pro 8 to calculate timing and percentage of TVF closure during the compression phase. Across all 7 participants, the TVFs were abducted at the onset of the compression phase of cough with subsequent adduction occurring at varying times. The average percentage of TVF closure during the compression phase of cough was 47.4% (SD=22.5). Conclusions: A substantial portion of the compression phase of cough is spent with abducted TVFs in participants with UVFI. Future research comparing TVF adduction during the compression phase of cough in healthy individuals is indicated to determine whether this finding is atypical or not.

Biographies

Sandra Rios-Ayala
Major: Speech and Hearing Sciences

Sandra is a first-generation student from a farm working family and is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences at Portland State University. Sandra will be completing her Bachelor of Science this year and plans on taking a year to work on her graduate school application materials. She plans on applying to Master of Science programs in speech-language pathology with medical and bilingual, English/Spanish concentrations. Her career interests include partnering with underrepresented communities and bilingualism in medical settings. Afterwards, Sandra plans to apply to PhD programs in pursuit of becoming a university professor and mentoring undergraduate students. Sandra is a BUILD EXITO alumna and was introduced to research in partnership with BUILD EXITO. She is a member of the Speech, Swallowing, and Respiration Lab at PSU directed by her research mentor, Dr. Deanna Britton. Her experience with BUILD EXITO and the McNair Scholars program has supported her with her plans to obtain a PhD and continuing with research.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Deanna Britton
Deanna Britton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences at Portland State University (PSU), and at the Northwest Center for Voice & Swallowing in the Department of Otolaryngology (NWCVS) – Head & Neck Surgery at Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU) in Portland, Oregon. She is Board Certified in Neurogenic Communication Disorders in Adults by the Academy of Neurological Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS). She directs the Speech, Swallowing and Respiration (SSR) Lab, with locations at PSU and OHSU. Current research includes a focus on vocal fold kinematics and airflow during cough in individuals with unilateral vocal fold immobility, breathing-swallowing coordination and the impact of noninvasive ventilation on speech and swallowing in individuals with restrictive respiratory conditions related to neuromuscular disease.

Disciplines

Communication Sciences and Disorders | Medicine and Health Sciences | Speech and Hearing Science

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33526

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Aug 12th, 9:50 AM

Delayed True Vocal Fold Closure During Compression Phase of Cough in Individuals with Unilateral Vocal Fold Immobility

The efficient movement of the true vocal folds (TVFs) is important for an effective cough. There are three phases in a cough: inspiration, compression, and expulsion (Hillel, 2001). The purpose of this pilot study was to determine patterns of TVF closure during the compression phase of volitional cough in individuals with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI) with simultaneous airflow measurement. Seven participants with UVFI (7 females ages 29-84 years) underwent simultaneous flexible laryngeal endoscopy and airflow examination. Laryngeal endoscopy and airflow measures were temporally synchronized with audio/video images of TVF movement via Video Capture in LabChart Pro 8 to calculate timing and percentage of TVF closure during the compression phase. Across all 7 participants, the TVFs were abducted at the onset of the compression phase of cough with subsequent adduction occurring at varying times. The average percentage of TVF closure during the compression phase of cough was 47.4% (SD=22.5). Conclusions: A substantial portion of the compression phase of cough is spent with abducted TVFs in participants with UVFI. Future research comparing TVF adduction during the compression phase of cough in healthy individuals is indicated to determine whether this finding is atypical or not.