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Date

12-8-2020 1:00 PM

Abstract

In the United States, the Hispanic/Latinx community disproportionately experiences the burden of type 2 diabetes and its related complications that often result in premature death and contribute to years of life lost. Culturally appropriate diabetes interventions carried out in community health centers could help mitigate the current diabetes epidemic among Hispanic/Latinx people. In this research, we surveyed and summarized peer-reviewed publications on recent type 2 diabetes (T2D) intervention strategies focused on the Hispanic/Latinx population in a community health center clinic setting. As this is an ongoing and increasingly burdensome issue, this literature review will identify research needs for those of Hispanic/Latinx descent. Evaluating the recent literature on diabetes intervention strategies could aid in the future implementation of culturally appropriate care for this high-risk population. Identifying effective care strategies can be particularly important in safety-net clinics as they need to justify the continuation of programs that allow at-risk populations access to low- or no-cost healthcare services. Emphasizing the health care setting is vital as the majority of the Hispanic/Latinx population receives care at safety-net clinics, also known as community health centers (CHCs) or federally qualified health centers (FQHC). A literature review will provide information about the current state of T2D intervention and management strategies for Hispanic/Latinx people in a community health center setting. Preliminary results support the efficacy of various culturally appropriate T2D interventions that aid in the prevention, treatment, and ongoing management of T2D and its related complications. Future research focused on the diabetic Hispanic/Latinx population must refer to literature containing these successful intervention strategies that were tailored to this heterogeneous community.

Biographies

Soraya Castenada
Major: Public Health Studies
Soraya Castaneda is an undergraduate researcher working toward a Bachelor of Science in Public Health Studies; with an emphasis on Community Health Promotion from the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, and a minor degree in biology from Portland State University. She completed her Associate of Arts at Portland Community College in 2019 and transferred to Portland State afterward to complete her baccalaureate. Soraya is working under the guidance and mentorship of Dr. Leslie Bienen. She has continued to explore health disparities, chronic illness, and epidemiology as her primary research interests. Her research is guided by her values and focuses on bridging the gap between racial and ethnic subsets of the population that are in greater need of health intervention strategies. She believes that the work she does now and, in the future, will help mitigate chronic disease burden in high-risk populations with inadequate access to resources like healthcare. Soraya will be graduating from Portland State University in the spring of 2022. She plans on pursuing a MS in Public Health with an emphasis on epidemiology with the ultimate goal of obtaining a PhD in the field.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Leslie Bienen
Leslie Bienen is a veterinarian and a writer of fiction and nonfiction. She teaches primarily undergraduate courses at PSU, including Global Health, FRINQ, and Consumer Health. She is the pilot program coordinator for PSU’s BUILD EXITO program, an undergraduate research training program that supports students on their pathway to becoming scientific researchers. Her own research focuses on conservation medicine and on zoonotic (from nonhuman animals to humans) disease transmission. Conservation medicine strives to understand the interaction among human health, environmental changes and the health of nonhuman species. She was a co-investigator on the Bighorn Sheep Disease project, examining disease dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep. She has researched and written about several bat viruses transmissible to humans and sampled livestock in Nepal for bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis, surveying farmers about their understanding of these diseases. This is her first time mentoring in the McNair Program.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33589

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Aug 12th, 1:00 PM

The Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Expansion and Association with Community Health Center Funding; a Focused Look at the Diabetic Hispanic/Latinx Community

In the United States, the Hispanic/Latinx community disproportionately experiences the burden of type 2 diabetes and its related complications that often result in premature death and contribute to years of life lost. Culturally appropriate diabetes interventions carried out in community health centers could help mitigate the current diabetes epidemic among Hispanic/Latinx people. In this research, we surveyed and summarized peer-reviewed publications on recent type 2 diabetes (T2D) intervention strategies focused on the Hispanic/Latinx population in a community health center clinic setting. As this is an ongoing and increasingly burdensome issue, this literature review will identify research needs for those of Hispanic/Latinx descent. Evaluating the recent literature on diabetes intervention strategies could aid in the future implementation of culturally appropriate care for this high-risk population. Identifying effective care strategies can be particularly important in safety-net clinics as they need to justify the continuation of programs that allow at-risk populations access to low- or no-cost healthcare services. Emphasizing the health care setting is vital as the majority of the Hispanic/Latinx population receives care at safety-net clinics, also known as community health centers (CHCs) or federally qualified health centers (FQHC). A literature review will provide information about the current state of T2D intervention and management strategies for Hispanic/Latinx people in a community health center setting. Preliminary results support the efficacy of various culturally appropriate T2D interventions that aid in the prevention, treatment, and ongoing management of T2D and its related complications. Future research focused on the diabetic Hispanic/Latinx population must refer to literature containing these successful intervention strategies that were tailored to this heterogeneous community.