Title

Aerobic Oxidation Reactions Catalyzed by a Carbazolyl Porphyrin-Based conjugated Microporous polymer (TCPP-CMP)

Date

12-8-2020 2:15 PM

Abstract

Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) has been shown to be an effective solar fuel. Energy can be stored in H2O2 and released in fuel cells. For H2O2 to be a green fuel it must be produced using solar energy, water, and oxygen. In this project aerobic oxidation will be studied as a method for H2O2 production. Aerobic oxidation has been shown to produce H2O2 as either a final product or as a reaction byproduct. To study the extent to which H2O2 can be produced, we will study the photocatalyst, carbazolyl porphyrin-based p-conjugated microporous polymer (TCPP-CMP). TCPP-CMP is a metal-free photocatalyst that is recyclable and has been reported to be an efficient aerobic oxidation catalyst with either natural or artificial light for a variety of aerobic oxidation reactions. Thus, this study will focus on exploring the intermediate steps of this aerobic oxidation to trap produced H2O2, while also modifying TCPP-CMP to improve performance.

Biographies

Alejandra M. Acevedo
Major: Chemistry
Alejandra M. Acevedo is an undergraduate researcher pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. When she first started in her field, she was part of an analytical chemistry lab where she eventually realized she preferred working with colorful metals and met a faculty member who would eventually be her research professor, Dr. Theresa McCormick. In her lab she focuses on Nickel (II) tris-(pyridinethiolate) and its derivatives for hydrogen energy via a photochemical process. Her goal in her research is to produce an alternative renewable fuel source in order to combat climate change. Through her time in the lab, she has eventually come to see herself in a future involving inorganic chemistry. Over the course of her undergraduate career, she has experienced multiple opportunities in her community that have created a deep-rooted passion for mentoring. From tutoring chemistry/math at her nearby middle school to helping start a mentoring program through PSU’s Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program. She believes mentoring is key in promoting advancement for diverse students. This has fueled her goal of attaining a Ph.D. in the hopes of continuing in academia and aiding budding chemists.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theresa McCormick
Dr. Theresa McCormick is an associate professor at Portland State University in the department of chemistry. She received her PhD in Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) materials from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada in 2008 under the supervision of Dr. Suning Wang. She was then an NSERC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Rochester under the supervision of Dr. Richard Eisenberg, where she studied catalytic systems for proton reduction. Dr. McCormick then held a second postdoc at the University of Toronto under the supervision of Dr. Dwight Seferos, investigating heavy chalcogens in polymers for use in organic photovoltaics. In 2013, she began her independent career at Portland State University studying solar energy conversion reactions.

Disciplines

Chemistry

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33595

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Aug 12th, 2:15 PM

Aerobic Oxidation Reactions Catalyzed by a Carbazolyl Porphyrin-Based conjugated Microporous polymer (TCPP-CMP)

Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) has been shown to be an effective solar fuel. Energy can be stored in H2O2 and released in fuel cells. For H2O2 to be a green fuel it must be produced using solar energy, water, and oxygen. In this project aerobic oxidation will be studied as a method for H2O2 production. Aerobic oxidation has been shown to produce H2O2 as either a final product or as a reaction byproduct. To study the extent to which H2O2 can be produced, we will study the photocatalyst, carbazolyl porphyrin-based p-conjugated microporous polymer (TCPP-CMP). TCPP-CMP is a metal-free photocatalyst that is recyclable and has been reported to be an efficient aerobic oxidation catalyst with either natural or artificial light for a variety of aerobic oxidation reactions. Thus, this study will focus on exploring the intermediate steps of this aerobic oxidation to trap produced H2O2, while also modifying TCPP-CMP to improve performance.