Title

Optimizing Gold Nanoparticle-Fluorophore Interactions to Minimize Fluorescence Quenching

Date

12-8-2020 10:15 AM

Abstract

Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely used as drug delivery, cellular labeling and optical imaging agents. The overall goal is to design nanomaterials that are soluble in the biological environment, nontoxic, stable, and fluorescent with no to minimal background fluorescence. Studies have shown that the fluorophore in fluorescent dyes indeed interacts with metal surfaces through resonant energy transfer (FET) and the interaction of the nanomaterial and fluorescent dye is size-dependent. Fluorescence quenching is a critical mechanism to investigate for understanding the effect of AuNP sizes (10 nm, 20 nm, 30 nm, 40 nm, and 60 nm) on the fluorescent properties with various surface coating compositions. Although there are studies that have emphasized the impact of distance between the AuNP, larger particles are more prone to quenching with fluorescent dye. Therefore, the investigation of the optimal dye to prevent quenching and showing fluorescent is substantial in cellular labeling and optical imaging. The synthesis of hybrid lipid-coated nanomaterials with varying sizes, surface chemistry, and the charge will be evaluated to determine how these features play roles in fluorescent dye quenching. We will present UV-Vis spectroscopy and PTI fluorescent studies of nanoparticle-dye interactions. Through these studies, our goal is further to understand AuNP-dye interaction to help overcome existing barriers present in cellular labeling, and optical imaging agents.

Biographies

Felicia Zhou
Majors: Biology and Health Sciences
Felicia Zhou is on the pre-optometry track double majoring in Biology and Health Science. She is an NIH Build EXITO alumna and a McNair Scholar. Her research experience started as an undergraduate research assistant in the Mackiewicz Lab in the Chemistry Department at Portland State University. In the Mackiewicz Lab, her projects included investigating the biological interaction of gold nanoparticles and proteins and designing nanomaterials as contrasting and imaging agents to develop treatments for age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Felicia’s research interests comprise of designing treatments for currently irreversible eye diseases and making treatments more accessible for disadvantaged populations. She will be graduating in Summer 2020 and will apply to programs in Fall 2020. Through her background in Biology and Health Science, her goal is to obtain a PhD in Vision Science to further investigate vision research for irreversible eye diseases.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marilyn R Mackiewicz
Dr. Marilyn Mackiewicz is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Chemistry. She earned her doctorate in Chemistry at Texas A&M University in 2005.The Mackiewicz lab consists of modern-day explorers of the molecular world and architects of nanoscale materials. Our research is focused on the development of nanostructured materials for applications that relate to human health, the environment, and energy. Our major projects revolve around 1) the design of nanoscale materials for biomedical applications, 2) studying nanoparticle-biological interactions and nanotoxicology, 3) the development of diagnostic assays and imaging agents to monitor disease states and therapeutic response, and 4) systems for targeted drug delivery. Our long-term goal is to advance our bench side chemistry into translational applications in cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. At the same time, it is important to study the nanotoxicological effects of the new materials developed and their nanoparticle-biological interactions that will advance their designs.

Disciplines

Biology | Medicine and Health Sciences

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33529

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Aug 12th, 10:15 AM

Optimizing Gold Nanoparticle-Fluorophore Interactions to Minimize Fluorescence Quenching

Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely used as drug delivery, cellular labeling and optical imaging agents. The overall goal is to design nanomaterials that are soluble in the biological environment, nontoxic, stable, and fluorescent with no to minimal background fluorescence. Studies have shown that the fluorophore in fluorescent dyes indeed interacts with metal surfaces through resonant energy transfer (FET) and the interaction of the nanomaterial and fluorescent dye is size-dependent. Fluorescence quenching is a critical mechanism to investigate for understanding the effect of AuNP sizes (10 nm, 20 nm, 30 nm, 40 nm, and 60 nm) on the fluorescent properties with various surface coating compositions. Although there are studies that have emphasized the impact of distance between the AuNP, larger particles are more prone to quenching with fluorescent dye. Therefore, the investigation of the optimal dye to prevent quenching and showing fluorescent is substantial in cellular labeling and optical imaging. The synthesis of hybrid lipid-coated nanomaterials with varying sizes, surface chemistry, and the charge will be evaluated to determine how these features play roles in fluorescent dye quenching. We will present UV-Vis spectroscopy and PTI fluorescent studies of nanoparticle-dye interactions. Through these studies, our goal is further to understand AuNP-dye interaction to help overcome existing barriers present in cellular labeling, and optical imaging agents.