Date

8-11-2021 10:40 AM

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious medical condition that needs a diagnosis to be treated. The neurological exam used for diagnosis is not able to detect all TBIs. Without a TBI diagnosis, a patient is not able to get the necessary medical care in time which could potentially lead to long-term brain damage and mortality. Some blood biomarkers have been investigated and found to have a correlation with TBI. Testing the blood is more accessible to diagnose TBI; this could connect the patient with further medical treatment when a TBI is suspected through the test. In this experiment, the efficiency of two blood biomarkers GFAP and Tau are tested to identify which one is a better predictor for TBIs. Also, the concentration of the biomarkers are compared in three different groups which are; head injury trauma, polytrauma injuries (head trauma + one other trauma), non-head injuries traumas. This is a retrospective study that uses plasma samples and patient data from a study on trauma patients collected by the Trauma Research Lab at OHSU. Tau is analyzed using a multiplex kit and GFAP is analyzed using an ELISA, both from R&D Systems (Minneapolis, MN). The hypotheses are that the GFAP biomarker will be a better predictor for TBI than Tau, and the biomarkers concentration will be higher in the head injury group compared to the polytrauma and non-head injuries group.

Biographies

Rosol Hatim Mikail, Science and Public Health: Pre-clinical Health Science

Rosol Hatim Mikail is double-majoring in Science and Public Health Studies: Pre-clinical Health Science. She is part of the Trauma Research Lab at the Oregon Health & Science University. She is currently a McNair and a Build EXITO scholar. Also, she is part of the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia Initiative team with the Cultural Resource Centers at Portland State University. Rosol is a first-generation college student in her family. She is fluent in the Kurdish language and has a good understanding of the Arabic language as well. Rosol values mentoring since she has mentors in her life who support her with her academic and career goals. Therefore, she herself mentors high school students who need assistance with applying to colleges. Rosol aspires to be a doctor and a researcher who works internationally. Her field of interests are in trauma, neuroscience, public and global health.

Dr. Martin Schreiber, Faculty Mentor, Chairman of the Trauma Center Association of America

Dr. Martin Schreiber is the Chief of Trauma and the Chief of the Division of Trauma, Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery at Oregon Health & Science University. He is the Chairman of the Trauma Center Association of America. He is a Colonel in the US Army Reserve and has been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, and he has served as the Joint Theater Trauma System Director. He is an Adjunct Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Schreiber is also the director of the Trauma Research Laboratory, the Army Civilian Trauma Training Team and the Donald D. Trunkey Center for Civilian and Combat Casualty Care at OHSU. The Trauma Research Lab has been continuously funded by federal sources since 2001. Lab research interests include prehospital treatment of traumatic brain injury, resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock, hemorrhage control and development of novel blood products. Current funding sources include the Department of Defense, the NIH and private industry. The lab is engaged in over 40 investigational protocols at OHSU. Dr. Schreiber is considered a leader in the trauma community and he has been an invited speaker throughout the United States and around the world.

Disciplines

Public Health

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36187

Included in

Public Health Commons

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Aug 11th, 10:40 AM

Using Blood Biomarkers to Predict Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious medical condition that needs a diagnosis to be treated. The neurological exam used for diagnosis is not able to detect all TBIs. Without a TBI diagnosis, a patient is not able to get the necessary medical care in time which could potentially lead to long-term brain damage and mortality. Some blood biomarkers have been investigated and found to have a correlation with TBI. Testing the blood is more accessible to diagnose TBI; this could connect the patient with further medical treatment when a TBI is suspected through the test. In this experiment, the efficiency of two blood biomarkers GFAP and Tau are tested to identify which one is a better predictor for TBIs. Also, the concentration of the biomarkers are compared in three different groups which are; head injury trauma, polytrauma injuries (head trauma + one other trauma), non-head injuries traumas. This is a retrospective study that uses plasma samples and patient data from a study on trauma patients collected by the Trauma Research Lab at OHSU. Tau is analyzed using a multiplex kit and GFAP is analyzed using an ELISA, both from R&D Systems (Minneapolis, MN). The hypotheses are that the GFAP biomarker will be a better predictor for TBI than Tau, and the biomarkers concentration will be higher in the head injury group compared to the polytrauma and non-head injuries group.