Title

Efficacy of Curcumin in Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

Date

11-8-2021 9:10 AM

Abstract

Over 23 million people are affected by asthma in the United States and 262 million individuals globally. Asthma, if poorly controlled, is associated with significant morbidity as well as increased risk for mortality. Asthma involves several complex inflammatory pathways and processes including an increase in immune cell activation. Curcumin, the active constituent found in turmeric, has been studied in numerous in-vivo and in-vitro studies to generate anti-inflammatory effects in pulmonary diseases and, more recently, an increase in clinical data has become available. Since the most recent review assessing the role of curcumin in pulmonary disorders, additional clinical trials have been published and we are the first to provide a metaanalysis evaluating the efficacy of curcumin supplementation in asthma from clinical trials. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for eligible studies up to June 30, 2021, using medical subject headings and keywords for asthma. We included any clinical trial design, conducted in humans, assessing the efficacy of curcumin on asthma related symptoms and lung functioning. Two authors, using predefined criteria, independently screened, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias from included articles using predefined criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed for each outcome, with effect size reported as mean difference (MD) or as a standardized mean difference. 1,216 studies were screened, 8 included for review (n = 509) and adequate data from 3 trials (n = 203) included for meta-analysis. The majority of participants were of female sex (52.2%) and the mean age (SD) of participants was 39.23 (14.7) years. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) improved with curcumin supplementation (3 studies; pooled MD = 3.70 (1.00, 6.41), p=0.007, I2=0%) compared to control. Efficacy of curcumin supplementation on asthma symptoms more generally were discordant and safety data was only reported in two trials. Supplementation with curcumin may provide small improvements in FEV1%, however conclusions are limited by the small number of studies and sample sizes, poor methodological quality, inconsistent reporting of asthma related outcomes and high risk of bias of included studies. Additional, high-quality, human trials are needed to more robustly assess the efficacy of curcumin supplementation in asthma.

Biographies

Biographies

Tabitha Grow
Tabitha Grow is a student at Portland State University dual majoring in biology and public health. With a passion for health equity, her goal is to become a naturopathic practitioner to help communities thrive. She believes natural and botanical medicine, as well as preventative care, are keys to successful health outcomes. In her spare time, she is a volunteer with the Oregon Health Authority helping individuals apply for the Oregon Health Plan. Her focus with the McNair research scholarship is to study how curcumin impacts clinical symptoms in asthmatic patients. Her passion is driven by a family member being diagnosed at an early age and watching their continuous struggle. Her goal is to bring awareness to medical communities about the implications of using curcumin as a complementary supplement to standard care. As a single mother of a young child, she understands the value of family time and the importance of healthcare decisions. In her spare time, she is hiking the Portland trails looking to identify plant species or reading up on new scientific discoveries. She is passionate about the crux between gastroenterologic and immunologic systems, and will be pursuing further research in her graduate program.

Dr. Adam Sadowski: Faculty Mentor
Postdoctorial Researcher Dr. Adam Sadowski, ND, MS obtained his Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine and Master of Science in Integrative Medicine Research from the National University of Natural Medicine (NUNM) where he is currently a first-year resident and postdoctoral researcher with NUNM’s Helfgott Research Institute. At NUNM he provides primary care services and conducts research on complementary and integrative health practices. He has published in several peer-reviewed journals as well as presented research at national conferences. He helped PSU student and McNair Scholar, Tabitha Grow, conduct the first systematic review with meta-analysis assessing the efficacy and safety of curcumin supplementation in asthmatics.

Disciplines

Biology | Public Health

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36179

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Aug 11th, 9:10 AM

Efficacy of Curcumin in Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

Over 23 million people are affected by asthma in the United States and 262 million individuals globally. Asthma, if poorly controlled, is associated with significant morbidity as well as increased risk for mortality. Asthma involves several complex inflammatory pathways and processes including an increase in immune cell activation. Curcumin, the active constituent found in turmeric, has been studied in numerous in-vivo and in-vitro studies to generate anti-inflammatory effects in pulmonary diseases and, more recently, an increase in clinical data has become available. Since the most recent review assessing the role of curcumin in pulmonary disorders, additional clinical trials have been published and we are the first to provide a metaanalysis evaluating the efficacy of curcumin supplementation in asthma from clinical trials. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for eligible studies up to June 30, 2021, using medical subject headings and keywords for asthma. We included any clinical trial design, conducted in humans, assessing the efficacy of curcumin on asthma related symptoms and lung functioning. Two authors, using predefined criteria, independently screened, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias from included articles using predefined criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed for each outcome, with effect size reported as mean difference (MD) or as a standardized mean difference. 1,216 studies were screened, 8 included for review (n = 509) and adequate data from 3 trials (n = 203) included for meta-analysis. The majority of participants were of female sex (52.2%) and the mean age (SD) of participants was 39.23 (14.7) years. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) improved with curcumin supplementation (3 studies; pooled MD = 3.70 (1.00, 6.41), p=0.007, I2=0%) compared to control. Efficacy of curcumin supplementation on asthma symptoms more generally were discordant and safety data was only reported in two trials. Supplementation with curcumin may provide small improvements in FEV1%, however conclusions are limited by the small number of studies and sample sizes, poor methodological quality, inconsistent reporting of asthma related outcomes and high risk of bias of included studies. Additional, high-quality, human trials are needed to more robustly assess the efficacy of curcumin supplementation in asthma.