Title

A Cyber-Anthropological Interrogation of East Asian Parenting Styles and Kinship Systems

Date

11-8-2021 12:45 PM

Abstract

Cyber-anthropology is a crucial, and perhaps underexplored, aspect of contemporary anthropological research. Cyber-anthropologists seek to analyze and comprehend the seemingly complex reciprocal relations that exist between humans and computer driven realities. Cyber-anthropology is certainly applicable to ethnographic research and analysis. Dr. Amy Chua dissects the East-Asian cultural phenomenon of the “Tiger Mom” and the relatively strict parenting style often associated with Tiger Mothers and East-Asian cultural communities. This research paper examines East-Asian parenting styles, specifically the concept of the “Tiger Mom” and the correlatives that exist regarding academic performance, mental health and the disparities that often present themselves when examined via a western perspective. East-Asian parenting dynamics, anecdotes and outcomes are examined via cultural histories and the anecdotal experiences of Asian Identified folks within cyberspace communities formed via the internet, thus providing critical insights into the culture of “tiger moms” and its correlative outcomes regarding mental health and academic performance.

Biographies

Catherine Lefevre, Anthropology

I’m currently a senior at Portland State University studying anthropology. I was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii. I grew up in a town called Manoa valley, noted for its heavy rainfall (not too dissimilar from PDX). Growing up in Hawaii, I was exposed to a wonderful array of cultural heritage, traditions, and cuisines. I enjoy perusing Powell’s bookstore while here in Portland and love anything non-fiction or written by Joseph Campbell. I’ve interned at Outside-In, a local Portland non-profit working to bridge healthcare and access related disparities among uninsured and economically marginalized folks. I’m passionate about the intersections of indigenous identity, contemporary iterations of indigeneity, and the adaptive and integral role of culture, folklore and diaspora.

Dr. Charles Klein, Faculty Mentor, Chair of the Anthology Department

Charles Klein is an applied medical and urban anthropologist with over 25 years of research experience in Brazil and the United States. He earned a BA in Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, a J.D., from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Klein has been part of the faculty at PSU since 2012 and is currently an Associate Professor and Chair of the Anthropology Department. He has received grants from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright-Hays program, and the Social Science Research Council. His current research focuses on developing a sexual health promotion app for transgender women in the United States and examining intersectional cultural politics in São Paulo, Brazil. Uniting his work is a commitment to supporting healthy communities through community-engaged research and understanding the complex interactions between public policy, politics and everyday life.

Disciplines

Anthropology

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36198

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Aug 11th, 12:45 PM

A Cyber-Anthropological Interrogation of East Asian Parenting Styles and Kinship Systems

Cyber-anthropology is a crucial, and perhaps underexplored, aspect of contemporary anthropological research. Cyber-anthropologists seek to analyze and comprehend the seemingly complex reciprocal relations that exist between humans and computer driven realities. Cyber-anthropology is certainly applicable to ethnographic research and analysis. Dr. Amy Chua dissects the East-Asian cultural phenomenon of the “Tiger Mom” and the relatively strict parenting style often associated with Tiger Mothers and East-Asian cultural communities. This research paper examines East-Asian parenting styles, specifically the concept of the “Tiger Mom” and the correlatives that exist regarding academic performance, mental health and the disparities that often present themselves when examined via a western perspective. East-Asian parenting dynamics, anecdotes and outcomes are examined via cultural histories and the anecdotal experiences of Asian Identified folks within cyberspace communities formed via the internet, thus providing critical insights into the culture of “tiger moms” and its correlative outcomes regarding mental health and academic performance.