Title

The Social Determinants of Human Milk Banking: Impacts of Demographic and Geographical Factors on Human Milk Donor Behavior

Date

11-8-2021 2:40 PM

Abstract

Human milk banking is a vital source of milk for infants for a multitude of reasons. Many of which go to medically fragile infants in Newborn Intensive Care Units (NICUs). The purpose of this study is to learn about how the social determinants of health and graphical factors affect human milk donor behavior through GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping to provide recommendations on how to improve overall donor participation. This research was conducted through a partnership with a local human milk bank accredited by HMBANA called Northwest Mothers Milk Bank (NWMMB) located in Tigard, OR. Demographic and geographic data was extracted from their database which was then placed in GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping software to analyze. A geographical lens was used to identify the impacts of the demographic and geographic markers of the donors on human milk banking donor behavior.

Biographies

Zayba Afshar, Public Health: Health Sciences; Minor: Spanish

Zayba Afshar is an undergraduate student at Portland State University majoring in Public Health: Health Sciences with a minor in Spanish. She started her research career as a sophomore and has worked in the Emergency Department at the Oregon Health & Science University as a Research Assistant. As a Junior, she decided to pursue a certificate in Human Lactation because of her interests in maternal child health. As a senior, she decided to conduct research within a similar realm. For her Honors Thesis, she began researching interpersonal violence screening guidelines for pregnant patients and how it has changed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and the effect on BIPOC pregnant patients. As a McNair Scholar, this year she started working on a second research project with a non-profit milk bank in her community. Her goal is to go into an MD/MPH program that has a concentration in maternal child health and eventually apply for a Ph.D. program to teach and do research as a physician-scientist within her specialty. She also hopes to one day build a free women’s clinic in Afghanistan, where her family is from.

Dr. Claire Wheeler, Faculty Mentor, School of Public Health

Dr. Claire Wheeler is a former Emergency Medicine physician with a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. She has been teaching at Portland State University since 2005, currently as Assistant Professor within the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. At the SPH, Dr. Wheeler teaches multiple courses each year, primarily at the graduate level. She has developed several new courses for the University, on topics ranging from pathophysiology to eating behaviors to integrative women’s health. After leaving clinical practice in 2000, Dr. Wheeler became a faculty member at the Center for Mind-Body Medicine, based in Washington D.C., embarking on decades of public health work in the area of community level trauma resiliency, most recently in Sonoma and Shasta Counties in California, in response to wildfires. She has worked extensively with members of law enforcement, the military, and veterans using CMBM’s group model to provide training in stress management, trauma resiliency, and ACES. Dr. Wheeler’s research explored the role of dissociation (the freeze response) during traumatic injury events as a risk factor for the development of post-injury PTSD and depression. Dr. Wheeler is the author of three books: 10 Simple Solutions to Stress (2007, New Harbinger, Oakland), The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Belly Fat Loss (2013, Penguin/Alpha Books, NY), and Pocket Therapy Guide to Stress (2020, New Harbinger, Oakland).

Disciplines

Public Health

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36207

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 11th, 2:40 PM

The Social Determinants of Human Milk Banking: Impacts of Demographic and Geographical Factors on Human Milk Donor Behavior

Human milk banking is a vital source of milk for infants for a multitude of reasons. Many of which go to medically fragile infants in Newborn Intensive Care Units (NICUs). The purpose of this study is to learn about how the social determinants of health and graphical factors affect human milk donor behavior through GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping to provide recommendations on how to improve overall donor participation. This research was conducted through a partnership with a local human milk bank accredited by HMBANA called Northwest Mothers Milk Bank (NWMMB) located in Tigard, OR. Demographic and geographic data was extracted from their database which was then placed in GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping software to analyze. A geographical lens was used to identify the impacts of the demographic and geographic markers of the donors on human milk banking donor behavior.