Title

Measuring The Correlation Between Adverse Childhood Experience And The Severity Of Psoriasis Within Portland State University Community

Date

8-11-2021 2:50 PM

Abstract

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with different types of triggers, one being stress. Psoriasis affects the personal and social lives of patients, which can result in psychological strain. With the Adverse Childhood Experience it is reported to impact a person’s mental health problems severely due to the toxic stress from violence, abuse, emotional neglect, sexual abuse, or substances misuse. This study explains the coloration between psoriasis and Adverse Childhood Experiences with the intent of showing how a patient that suffers from ACES can potentially have worsen skin condition. This is important because there is a need in addressing the importance of psychological effects of psoriasis with hopes for better understanding and treatment of patients.

Biographies

Thy Bach, Health Science: Health Studies (pre-med track)

Thy Bach is majoring in health science: health studies with a pre-med track. She is currently a McNair Scholar at Portland State University and is also a part of the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University as a research assistant working on COVID-19 related cases. Thy is also a volunteer for Providence Medical Center helping to distribute vaccines to her community. Her research interest includes learning more about the chronic inflammatory skin disorder called psoriasis and adverse childhood experience (ACEs). She believes that with further research surrounding the topic of psoriasis, it can improve patients’ future mental and physical health care and can add knowledge to known stress related triggers with psoriasis. She will continue her Bachelor’s of Science Degree, graduate in Spring of 2022, and will furthermore apply to medical school to pursue internal care or dermatology.

Dr. Claire Wheeler, Faculty Mentor, School of Public Health

Dr. Claire Wheeler is a former Emergency Medicine physician with a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. She has been teaching at Portland State University since 2005, currently as Assistant Professor within the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. At the SPH, Dr. Wheeler teaches multiple courses each year, primarily at the graduate level. She has developed several new courses for the University, on topics ranging from pathophysiology to eating behaviors to integrative women’s health. After leaving clinical practice in 2000, Dr. Wheeler became a faculty member at the Center for Mind-Body Medicine, based in Washington D.C., embarking on decades of public health work in the area of community level trauma resiliency, most recently in Sonoma and Shasta Counties in California, in response to wildfires. She has worked extensively with members of law enforcement, the military, and veterans using CMBM’s group model to provide training in stress management, trauma resiliency, and ACES. Dr. Wheeler’s research explored the role of dissociation (the freeze response) during traumatic injury events as a risk factor for the development of post-injury PTSD and depression. Dr. Wheeler is the author of three books: 10 Simple Solutions to Stress (2007, New Harbinger, Oakland), The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Belly Fat Loss (2013, Penguin/Alpha Books, NY), and Pocket Therapy Guide to Stress (2020, New Harbinger, Oakland).

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36208

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Aug 11th, 2:50 PM

Measuring The Correlation Between Adverse Childhood Experience And The Severity Of Psoriasis Within Portland State University Community

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with different types of triggers, one being stress. Psoriasis affects the personal and social lives of patients, which can result in psychological strain. With the Adverse Childhood Experience it is reported to impact a person’s mental health problems severely due to the toxic stress from violence, abuse, emotional neglect, sexual abuse, or substances misuse. This study explains the coloration between psoriasis and Adverse Childhood Experiences with the intent of showing how a patient that suffers from ACES can potentially have worsen skin condition. This is important because there is a need in addressing the importance of psychological effects of psoriasis with hopes for better understanding and treatment of patients.