Title

Reporting Adherence to Resistance Training in Cancer Survivors and their Partners: A Comparison Between Prescribed and Received Training Dose

Date

11-8-2021 3:15 PM

Abstract

Resistance training is increasingly recognized as a behavioral strategy that can negate the adverse effects of cancer treatment. The exercise prescriptions were derived from trial method reports which may not reflect the actual dose of exercise in relation to study outcomes. It is possible, therefore, that the dose of exercise necessary to evoke a particular benefit may differ from published recommendations. Purpose: To report exercise adherence and dose in a resistance training program for cancer survivors and their partners. Furthermore, we aim to assess tolerability, compliance, and strength outcomes by comparing received training volume. Methods: Preliminary data from 25 participants enrolled in the EXERCISING TOGETHER© trial (NCT03630354), included breast cancer survivors (n=13) and their partners (n=12) was used for this analysis. Participants competed strength training sessions twice weekly for 6 months in one of two study arms: partnered group or separate survivor/spouse group exercise. We examined the prescribed volume for two exercises, chair stands and step-ups, and compared to self-reported volume, collected in participant exercise logs. Prescribed training volume and received training volume was calculated (sets x repetitions x load in kg). Here, we report adherence of prescribed training volume and received training volume in the overall sample as well as adherence based on role (survivor/spouse), and study arm. Comparisons between role and study arm were completed using two sample t-tests. Results Within person adherence to prescribed dose averaged 72.6% of classes for chair stand and 70.5% of classes for step ups. There was not a significant difference in adherence between survivors and partners. Stratified analysis suggests survivor adherence improves and partner adherence decreases when in class together, but the study was underpowered to see significant differences between study arms. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that breast cancer survivors may benefit when partners are involved in exercise, but that, in turn, may reduce the partners own benefit from exercise. Future analysis can examine the achieved dose of exercise in relation to participant benefits to determine the full implications of these observations.

Biographies

Oliver Lumbad, Applied Health & Fitness

Oliver Lumbad is a recent graduate of Portland State University ‘s Applied Health & Fitness at the OHSUPSU collaborative School of Public Health. At Portland State, I focused my academic coursework in human anatomy and physiology, exercise testing and prescription, and exercise physiology. I am particularly interested in the use of physical activity to manage and prevent chronic diseases. I was one of 72 students selected to be a part of the highly competitive NIH BUILD EXITO Program in 2019 and the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program in 2021 – where I engaged in two years of undergraduate research at OHSU’s Knight Cancer Research Building on adherence of cancer survivors and their partners to a resistance training program. Ultimately, I intend to pursue a Doctor of Physical Therapy, and engage in work that involves the use of sports medicine to serve individuals in underserved communities.

Dr. Kerri Winters-Stone Faculty Mentor | Exercise Scientist and Professor at OHSU

Dr. Kerri Winters-Stone, is an exercise scientist and Distinguished Professor at Oregon Health & Science University. She is also co-director of the Knight Community Partnership Program and Co-program leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program for the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center. As a scientist, Dr. Winters-Stone’s research focuses on the effects of cancer treatment on musculoskeletal health and cancer recurrence risk and the ability of exercise to improve health and longevity in cancer survivors. Just recently, Dr. Winters- Stone received new NCI funding to determine the patterns and predictors of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and mobility impairment during neurotoxic chemotherapy and several NCI supplements to integrate digital technology as a tool for continuous passive monitoring of mobility in aging cancer patients.

Disciplines

Public Health

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36210

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Aug 11th, 3:15 PM

Reporting Adherence to Resistance Training in Cancer Survivors and their Partners: A Comparison Between Prescribed and Received Training Dose

Resistance training is increasingly recognized as a behavioral strategy that can negate the adverse effects of cancer treatment. The exercise prescriptions were derived from trial method reports which may not reflect the actual dose of exercise in relation to study outcomes. It is possible, therefore, that the dose of exercise necessary to evoke a particular benefit may differ from published recommendations. Purpose: To report exercise adherence and dose in a resistance training program for cancer survivors and their partners. Furthermore, we aim to assess tolerability, compliance, and strength outcomes by comparing received training volume. Methods: Preliminary data from 25 participants enrolled in the EXERCISING TOGETHER© trial (NCT03630354), included breast cancer survivors (n=13) and their partners (n=12) was used for this analysis. Participants competed strength training sessions twice weekly for 6 months in one of two study arms: partnered group or separate survivor/spouse group exercise. We examined the prescribed volume for two exercises, chair stands and step-ups, and compared to self-reported volume, collected in participant exercise logs. Prescribed training volume and received training volume was calculated (sets x repetitions x load in kg). Here, we report adherence of prescribed training volume and received training volume in the overall sample as well as adherence based on role (survivor/spouse), and study arm. Comparisons between role and study arm were completed using two sample t-tests. Results Within person adherence to prescribed dose averaged 72.6% of classes for chair stand and 70.5% of classes for step ups. There was not a significant difference in adherence between survivors and partners. Stratified analysis suggests survivor adherence improves and partner adherence decreases when in class together, but the study was underpowered to see significant differences between study arms. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that breast cancer survivors may benefit when partners are involved in exercise, but that, in turn, may reduce the partners own benefit from exercise. Future analysis can examine the achieved dose of exercise in relation to participant benefits to determine the full implications of these observations.