Title of Presentation

Evaluating the Implementation and Dissemination of an Adolescent Sexual Health Program in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

Presenter Biography

Megan Skye, MPH, CCRP
Data Manager, Center for Healthy Communities

Megan Skye recently graduated from OHSU-PSU School of Public Health with an MPH in Biostatistics. She uses the skills gained while pursuing her degree to organize, clean, and assist in analyzing data from the Native STAND project. Prior to working with the Oregon PRC, Megan worked with the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute at OHSU as a Clinical Research Coordinator, during which she acquired a Certified Clinical Research Professional (CCRP) certification. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Anthropology from the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Caitlin Donald, MSW
Program Manager, Center for Healthy Communities

Caitlin Donald serves as the Program Manager where she oversees the day-to-day operations for the Center for Healthy Communities. She is a citizen of the Osage Nation and a descendant of the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma. Prior to joining OHSU, Ms. Donald worked in partnership with Native communities for 7 years in research, workforce development, mental health, health promotion, child welfare, and the arts. She received her Bachelor’s in Social Work from Portland State University and her Master’s in Social Work from Washington University in St. Louis.

Jennifer Seamans, MST
Research Assistant, Center for Healthy Communities

Jennifer Seamans is an MPH Epidemiology student at the Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University (OHSU-PSU) School of Public Health, with interests that include the influences of structural inequalities on life course and intergenerational health, and implications for public health practice and policy. She is currently completing supervised research on racial differences in the association between maternal early life adversity and asthma in children. As a research assistant in the Oregon Prevention Research Center (PRC), she also supports evaluation and dissemination of a culturally appropriate sexual health curriculum for AI/AN teens. Prior to pursuing the MPH, Jen earned a MST in science learning and assessment, and worked for over a decade managing community-centered watershed health projects.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Event Website

www.oregonprc.org

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Background: American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth health behaviors are influenced by a unique context of sociocultural and environmental factors. Mainstream messages regarding sexual health are frequently inappropriate and ineffective. Dissemination and evaluation of culturally appropriate, evidence-based programs is necessary to fill this gap. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation and dissemination of Native STAND, a curriculum designed to enhance and promote healthy decision-making regarding relationships, STIs, and teen pregnancy among AI/AN youth.

Methods: 48 tribal health educators from rural and urban communities were trained to deliver the Native STAND curriculum. To date, 38 sites have implemented the curriculum, and 886 AI/AN youth have completed pre- and post- surveys on knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. Evaluation follows the RE-AIM framework and includes qualitative and quantitative measures of Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance at the levels of tribal organization, educator, and youth participant.

Results: Data analysis is in progress. Preliminary analyses indicate positive shifts in health behavior. The percentage of 366 boys reporting they were “definitely sure” that could use a condom correctly increased from 46 to 63%, and 424 girls from 36 to 56%. Similarly, the percentage of 356 boys indicating they were “definitely sure” they could get a condom increased from 49 to 62%, and 428 girls increased from 39 to 51%.

Implications: Project outcomes will expand available evidence toward the development of best practices for culturally appropriate adolescent sexual health education programming in AI/AN rural and urban communities.

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Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM Apr 3rd, 4:00 PM

Evaluating the Implementation and Dissemination of an Adolescent Sexual Health Program in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Background: American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth health behaviors are influenced by a unique context of sociocultural and environmental factors. Mainstream messages regarding sexual health are frequently inappropriate and ineffective. Dissemination and evaluation of culturally appropriate, evidence-based programs is necessary to fill this gap. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation and dissemination of Native STAND, a curriculum designed to enhance and promote healthy decision-making regarding relationships, STIs, and teen pregnancy among AI/AN youth.

Methods: 48 tribal health educators from rural and urban communities were trained to deliver the Native STAND curriculum. To date, 38 sites have implemented the curriculum, and 886 AI/AN youth have completed pre- and post- surveys on knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. Evaluation follows the RE-AIM framework and includes qualitative and quantitative measures of Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance at the levels of tribal organization, educator, and youth participant.

Results: Data analysis is in progress. Preliminary analyses indicate positive shifts in health behavior. The percentage of 366 boys reporting they were “definitely sure” that could use a condom correctly increased from 46 to 63%, and 424 girls from 36 to 56%. Similarly, the percentage of 356 boys indicating they were “definitely sure” they could get a condom increased from 49 to 62%, and 428 girls increased from 39 to 51%.

Implications: Project outcomes will expand available evidence toward the development of best practices for culturally appropriate adolescent sexual health education programming in AI/AN rural and urban communities.

https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/publichealthpdx/2019/Posters/11