Title of Presentation

Cannabis Use for Relief of Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Can Do MS Webinar Attendees

Presenter Biography

I am an MS Biostatistics candidate at the OHSU/PSU School of Public Health. I have been working at OHSU as Michelle Cameron's research coordinator since July of 2014, researching gait and imbalance in multiple sclerosis.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Biostatistics

Degree

MS

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Introduction: Research suggests that cannabis helps relieve multiple sclerosis (MS)-associated pain and spasticity but knowledge of cannabis use by people with MS is limited.

Objectives: To understand associations between cannabis use for MS symptoms and cannabis legality, disease severity, and demographics.

Methods: 1015 MS patients in the US and Canada attending a webinar on cannabis for MS symptoms were asked whether they had ever, or in the past year, used marijuana for their MS symptoms and whether medical marijuana is legal in their state. Demographics, disease severity and duration were obtained from webinar registration. States were then categorized by legal status and length of time since medical legalization of cannabis. Logistic regression models were fit to explore associations of covariates with cannabis use in the past year. A secondary logistic regression model was fit to explore associations of covariates with respondents’ knowledge of their state’s legal status. Likelihood of use by true legal status vs. perception of legal status were also compared.

Results: There were statistically significantly higher odds of cannabis use in men (OR 2.33, 95% CI: [1.10,4.94]), those with more severe disease (OR 3.41, [1.23,9.46]), in states where medical (OR 1.91, [0.78,4.64]) and recreational (OR 4.55, [1.70,12.14]) is legal, and per year medical legalization (OR 1.06, [1.02,1.10]). Knowledge of cannabis legality was significantly higher in those using cannabis in the past year, where cannabis is legal and has been legal for longer, and Americans vs. Canadians.

Conclusions: Odds of cannabis use for MS increase with legal status, duration of legality, and with disease severity.

Comments/Notes

I'm happy to give an oral presentation, or just to present a poster.

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Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM Apr 3rd, 4:00 PM

Cannabis Use for Relief of Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Can Do MS Webinar Attendees

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Introduction: Research suggests that cannabis helps relieve multiple sclerosis (MS)-associated pain and spasticity but knowledge of cannabis use by people with MS is limited.

Objectives: To understand associations between cannabis use for MS symptoms and cannabis legality, disease severity, and demographics.

Methods: 1015 MS patients in the US and Canada attending a webinar on cannabis for MS symptoms were asked whether they had ever, or in the past year, used marijuana for their MS symptoms and whether medical marijuana is legal in their state. Demographics, disease severity and duration were obtained from webinar registration. States were then categorized by legal status and length of time since medical legalization of cannabis. Logistic regression models were fit to explore associations of covariates with cannabis use in the past year. A secondary logistic regression model was fit to explore associations of covariates with respondents’ knowledge of their state’s legal status. Likelihood of use by true legal status vs. perception of legal status were also compared.

Results: There were statistically significantly higher odds of cannabis use in men (OR 2.33, 95% CI: [1.10,4.94]), those with more severe disease (OR 3.41, [1.23,9.46]), in states where medical (OR 1.91, [0.78,4.64]) and recreational (OR 4.55, [1.70,12.14]) is legal, and per year medical legalization (OR 1.06, [1.02,1.10]). Knowledge of cannabis legality was significantly higher in those using cannabis in the past year, where cannabis is legal and has been legal for longer, and Americans vs. Canadians.

Conclusions: Odds of cannabis use for MS increase with legal status, duration of legality, and with disease severity.