Title of Presentation

Closing the Loop on Academic Evaluations

Presenter Biography

Gabriel Franta is an MD/MPH student at the Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health. He is from the North Star State of Minnesota and is interested in numerous public health research focuses, including social determinants of health and geographical differences in health outcomes, especially those related to childhood development or mood disorders. He is interested in practicing pediatrics or psychiatry, and along the way has become interested in education methods and institutional changes.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

MD/MPH

Presentation Type

Presentation

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Professors who teach at the graduate level rarely receive formal instruction for adult education. Compounding this shortcoming, professors struggle with limited time, resources, and incentives to improve teaching quality. Student evaluation of course experience and knowledge learned is an important component of curriculum and teaching improvement. However, post-course survey feedback often has a low response rate, limiting the utility of the feedback for professors interested in improving their courses. There is limited understanding of what factors influence the decisions of students to respond to surveys and the methods that faculty employ to improve course experience and knowledge gained. This qualitative study of students and faculty at the Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health is proposed to better understand student motivation to complete course evaluations, as well as faculty perspectives regarding institutional support to improve teaching strategies and incentives to enhance a course. We propose interviewing a select group of faculty and students in the School of Public Health to participate in semi-structured interviews regarding course feedback and improvement. Participants will be recruited via email. We anticipate that faculty and students will brainstorm creative ideas to improve survey response rates and overall techniques to improve course experience and knowledge attainment that will improve upon the current system that leaves both students and faculty unsatisfied with the education and feedback system.

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Apr 3rd, 4:30 PM Apr 3rd, 4:43 PM

Closing the Loop on Academic Evaluations

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Professors who teach at the graduate level rarely receive formal instruction for adult education. Compounding this shortcoming, professors struggle with limited time, resources, and incentives to improve teaching quality. Student evaluation of course experience and knowledge learned is an important component of curriculum and teaching improvement. However, post-course survey feedback often has a low response rate, limiting the utility of the feedback for professors interested in improving their courses. There is limited understanding of what factors influence the decisions of students to respond to surveys and the methods that faculty employ to improve course experience and knowledge gained. This qualitative study of students and faculty at the Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health is proposed to better understand student motivation to complete course evaluations, as well as faculty perspectives regarding institutional support to improve teaching strategies and incentives to enhance a course. We propose interviewing a select group of faculty and students in the School of Public Health to participate in semi-structured interviews regarding course feedback and improvement. Participants will be recruited via email. We anticipate that faculty and students will brainstorm creative ideas to improve survey response rates and overall techniques to improve course experience and knowledge attainment that will improve upon the current system that leaves both students and faculty unsatisfied with the education and feedback system.