Title of Presentation

Differential Association of Gender with Suicide Risk among Sexual Minority and Disabled Youth

Presenter Biography

César Higgins Tejera is a data analyst and candidate in the Master of Science in Biostatistics at Oregon Health and Science University. His current work focuses on studying health disparities among Lesbian Gay and Bisexual (LGB) adults and adults living with disabilities. His research experiences varies from analyzing qualitative data to applying regression modeling to understand diverse association between behavioral risk factors and a variety of health outcomes. His approach to population health research encompasses the application of theoretical epidemiologic frameworks, biostatistics methods, gender, race, disability, and LGB identities. He is a student member of the American Statistical Association, American Public Health Association, and Oregon Public Health Association. César started his career as a medical doctor and worked in Hospital de Natagaima (Colombia) as primary care physician.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Biostatistics

Degree

MS

Presentation Type

Presentation

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Background: Prior studies suggest that female youth are at increased risk of suicide compared to males. However, research suggests that homosexual/bisexual males have increased odds of suicide attempts compared to homosexual/bisexual women. Little is known about gender differences in suicide risk among teenagers with intersectional identities. The objective of this study was to examine gender differences in suicide risk among lesbian/gay/bisexual youth with disabilities.

Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 2015-2017 Oregon Healthy Teens Survey. A total of 25,476 11th graders participated in the survey. We used Poisson regression analysis with robust variance to estimate Prevalence Ratios of suicide attempts. We derived three measures of interaction in the additive scale to estimate the risk of suicide among intersectional teens (disabled and sexual minority), stratified by gender: 1) the excess risk due to interaction (RERI); 2) the proportion attributable to interaction (AP); and 3) the synergy index (SI).

Results: Interaction effects were not significant for female teens: RERI= 0.62 (95% CI:-1.34 – 2.57); AP=0.08 (95% CI: -0.17 – 0.33); SI=1.10 (95% CI: 0.81 – 1.51). Conversely, all three estimations of interaction were significant for male teens: RERI= 9.96 (95% CI: 3.92 – 15.99); AP=0.51 (95% CI: 0.31 – 0.72); SI=2.19 (95% CI: 1.36 – 3.52).

Conclusion: These findings provide strong evidence that the risk of suicide among male gay/bisexual teens who also have disabilities is multiplicative, whereas the combination of disability and identifying as lesbian or bisexual appears to have less than an additive effect on suicide risk among female teens.

Comments/Notes

I would be flexible with either a poster or an oral presentation. But, I really would like to be considered for an oral presentation. I believe that students and faculty will benefit from the novel application of statistical methods to test for intersectional theory. Intersectionality has often been overlook among teenagers with disabilities, therefore the public health importance of this project.

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Apr 3rd, 5:28 PM Apr 3rd, 5:41 PM

Differential Association of Gender with Suicide Risk among Sexual Minority and Disabled Youth

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Background: Prior studies suggest that female youth are at increased risk of suicide compared to males. However, research suggests that homosexual/bisexual males have increased odds of suicide attempts compared to homosexual/bisexual women. Little is known about gender differences in suicide risk among teenagers with intersectional identities. The objective of this study was to examine gender differences in suicide risk among lesbian/gay/bisexual youth with disabilities.

Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 2015-2017 Oregon Healthy Teens Survey. A total of 25,476 11th graders participated in the survey. We used Poisson regression analysis with robust variance to estimate Prevalence Ratios of suicide attempts. We derived three measures of interaction in the additive scale to estimate the risk of suicide among intersectional teens (disabled and sexual minority), stratified by gender: 1) the excess risk due to interaction (RERI); 2) the proportion attributable to interaction (AP); and 3) the synergy index (SI).

Results: Interaction effects were not significant for female teens: RERI= 0.62 (95% CI:-1.34 – 2.57); AP=0.08 (95% CI: -0.17 – 0.33); SI=1.10 (95% CI: 0.81 – 1.51). Conversely, all three estimations of interaction were significant for male teens: RERI= 9.96 (95% CI: 3.92 – 15.99); AP=0.51 (95% CI: 0.31 – 0.72); SI=2.19 (95% CI: 1.36 – 3.52).

Conclusion: These findings provide strong evidence that the risk of suicide among male gay/bisexual teens who also have disabilities is multiplicative, whereas the combination of disability and identifying as lesbian or bisexual appears to have less than an additive effect on suicide risk among female teens.