Institution

PSU

Presentation Type

Presentation

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Sexual and gender minority populations are not currently being accurately tracked or counted in most domestic violence (DV) and intimate partner violence (IPV) surveillance programs in Oregon. However, research indicates that LGBTQ+ populations experience IPV at rates comparable or even higher than heterosexual populations. Additionally, distrust of law enforcement and services designed around heterosexual experiences of IPV further reduce the ability of LGBTQ+ populations, particularly transgender women, to access IPV services. We propose that through the use of a PRECEED-PROCEED model, a program could be developed to more accurately collect sexual orientation and gender identity data by IPV service providers in Oregon in order to ensure that programs are accessible and relevant, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Utilizing a theory-informed approach based on the social ecological model, we propose a program for improving the accuracy of data collection and awareness of IPV in LGBTQ+ communities as a tool to reduce health disparities.

Comments/Notes

This presentation is based on a project as part of an SPH program planning course.

Example of a program planning abstract:

https://sites.uco.edu/ceps/files/khs/khs-sample-abstract.pdf

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Apr 3rd, 4:44 PM Apr 3rd, 4:59 PM

A Data Collection Program for Reducing IPV in LGBTQ+ Communities

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Sexual and gender minority populations are not currently being accurately tracked or counted in most domestic violence (DV) and intimate partner violence (IPV) surveillance programs in Oregon. However, research indicates that LGBTQ+ populations experience IPV at rates comparable or even higher than heterosexual populations. Additionally, distrust of law enforcement and services designed around heterosexual experiences of IPV further reduce the ability of LGBTQ+ populations, particularly transgender women, to access IPV services. We propose that through the use of a PRECEED-PROCEED model, a program could be developed to more accurately collect sexual orientation and gender identity data by IPV service providers in Oregon in order to ensure that programs are accessible and relevant, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Utilizing a theory-informed approach based on the social ecological model, we propose a program for improving the accuracy of data collection and awareness of IPV in LGBTQ+ communities as a tool to reduce health disparities.