Title of Presentation

The influence climate change will have on the vectorial capacity of the Aedes aegypti mosquito in South America: a systematic map

Presenter Biography

Liliana Diaz is a junior at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, and is a member of McNair and LSAMP. Her career goals include pursuing an MPH in Epidemiology and a PhD in Infectious Disease & Microbiology.

Institution

PSU

Program/Major

Public Health - Health Sciences

Degree

BS

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 5:22 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 5:33 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33750

Keywords

climate change; aedes aegypti; vectorial capacity; vector distribution; systematic map

Abstract

Tropical infectious diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika affect millions of people annually in all regions of the world, and remain one of the major threats to global public health. The disease burden propagated by these arboviruses has rapidly increased in recent decades due to the range expansion of their shared vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito. As a poikilothermic, the vector shows remarkable competence at adapting to varying abiotic factors, particularly temperature. The thermal limits for the temperatures the Aedes aegypti is able to tolerate are 10°C and 40°C, and increasing temperatures affect the vector in numerous ways; including frequency of blood feeding, sex ratio, and population density. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported in 2014 that continued greenhouse gas emissions will eventually cause irreversible damage to all ecosystems. Given that the IPCC predicted a global increase in temperatures of 1.4-5.8°C over the next century, understanding how that will affect the vectorial capacity of the Aedes aegypti is an essential strategy for public health planning. While an exploratory review of the literature showcased an invested interest in this topic, there appeared to be a dearth in research related to South America, compared to other regions. This paper will examine findings from a systematic map on the current state of research on this increasingly important influence on infectious disease in South America. The objectives are to: (1) assess the geographical regions represented and (2) identify potential gaps in the existing literature concerning South America.

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The influence climate change will have on the vectorial capacity of the Aedes aegypti mosquito in South America: a systematic map

Tropical infectious diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika affect millions of people annually in all regions of the world, and remain one of the major threats to global public health. The disease burden propagated by these arboviruses has rapidly increased in recent decades due to the range expansion of their shared vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito. As a poikilothermic, the vector shows remarkable competence at adapting to varying abiotic factors, particularly temperature. The thermal limits for the temperatures the Aedes aegypti is able to tolerate are 10°C and 40°C, and increasing temperatures affect the vector in numerous ways; including frequency of blood feeding, sex ratio, and population density. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported in 2014 that continued greenhouse gas emissions will eventually cause irreversible damage to all ecosystems. Given that the IPCC predicted a global increase in temperatures of 1.4-5.8°C over the next century, understanding how that will affect the vectorial capacity of the Aedes aegypti is an essential strategy for public health planning. While an exploratory review of the literature showcased an invested interest in this topic, there appeared to be a dearth in research related to South America, compared to other regions. This paper will examine findings from a systematic map on the current state of research on this increasingly important influence on infectious disease in South America. The objectives are to: (1) assess the geographical regions represented and (2) identify potential gaps in the existing literature concerning South America.