Title of Presentation

Occupational Exposure to Lead from Electronic Recycling Facilities

Presenter Biography

Megan Farley is a first year MPH student in the Environmental Systems & Human Health Program. She has a Bachelor's degree in Biology from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. She has six years of clinical experience, where she currently work at an infectious disease clinic.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Environmental Systems and Human Health

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 5:34 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 5:39 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33751

Keywords

Lead, Exposure, Occupational, Metal, Electronic Recycling, E-cycling, E-waste, E-scrap

Abstract

Electronic recycling has become a rapidly expanding industry in the United States as the quantity of electronic usage has surpassed previous decades. Exposure to lead is a main concern for individuals working in electronic recycling facilities, as the novel industry is not yet highly regulated in the United States. A lack of regulation leaves employees more susceptible to work in hazardous conditions that increase potential for lead exposure. A systematic literature review indicated several markers for occupational lead exposure, including elevated blood lead levels, air, surface, and skin sampling, and recycling methods and improper cleaning techniques leading to increased lead exposure. Take home lead exposure has also been documented in children of electronic recycling employees. To decrease occupational lead exposures, many upstream and downstream methodologies are needed, including a Total Worker Health approach, to ensure proper running electronic recycling facilities that protect the health and well-being of employees.

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Apr 7th, 5:34 PM Apr 7th, 5:39 PM

Occupational Exposure to Lead from Electronic Recycling Facilities

Electronic recycling has become a rapidly expanding industry in the United States as the quantity of electronic usage has surpassed previous decades. Exposure to lead is a main concern for individuals working in electronic recycling facilities, as the novel industry is not yet highly regulated in the United States. A lack of regulation leaves employees more susceptible to work in hazardous conditions that increase potential for lead exposure. A systematic literature review indicated several markers for occupational lead exposure, including elevated blood lead levels, air, surface, and skin sampling, and recycling methods and improper cleaning techniques leading to increased lead exposure. Take home lead exposure has also been documented in children of electronic recycling employees. To decrease occupational lead exposures, many upstream and downstream methodologies are needed, including a Total Worker Health approach, to ensure proper running electronic recycling facilities that protect the health and well-being of employees.