Title of Presentation

Protecting Pregnant Prisoners: Assessing the Need for Statewide Anti-Shackling Legislation in Oregon

Presenter Biography

The Health of Incarcerated Populations student interest group at OHSU seeks to explore and advocate for improvements in public health issues specific to incarcerate people in Oregon and beyond.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Medicine

Degree

MD/MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 5:40 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 5:45 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33752

Abstract

Protecting Pregnant Prisoners: Assessing the Need for Statewide Anti-Shackling Laws in Oregon

Introduction & Significance: Despite accounting for only 4.3 percent of the global female population, the United States accounts for 30 percent of the world’s 700,000 incarcerated women. Of these, 6 - 10 percent of female prisoners are pregnant in the US. The American Medical Association condemns the use of shackles in labor and delivery, and federal policy has banned the practice. However, state carceral institutions remain subject to state legislation. Currently, 22 states — including Oregon — lack anti-shackling laws to protect the health of pregnant prisoners and their newborns.

Methods: This study reviewed policy briefs, laws, and literature studying the practice of shackling incarcerated women during pregnancy to better understand the current legislative atmosphere around the issue and identify gaps in research. This study looked specifically at data from Oregon jails and prisons to inform the need for statewide anti-shackling legislation.

Results: In 2017, Oregon ranked 23rd out of 50 states for rate of female incarceration (~62/100,000 population), with approximately 1,200 women incarcerated across the state. Despite medical condemnation of shackling, and ten years after receiving a D grade regarding shackling, Oregon still lacks legislation regarding shackling of pregnant prisoners.

Conclusion: Although Oregon claims leadership regarding reproductive health, it remains among the states that do not have anti-shackling legislation. If Oregon is to maintain its moral credibility, legislators, healthcare professionals, and social justice advocates must come together to address this betrayal of public health.

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Protecting Pregnant Prisoners: Assessing the Need for Statewide Anti-Shackling Legislation in Oregon

Protecting Pregnant Prisoners: Assessing the Need for Statewide Anti-Shackling Laws in Oregon

Introduction & Significance: Despite accounting for only 4.3 percent of the global female population, the United States accounts for 30 percent of the world’s 700,000 incarcerated women. Of these, 6 - 10 percent of female prisoners are pregnant in the US. The American Medical Association condemns the use of shackles in labor and delivery, and federal policy has banned the practice. However, state carceral institutions remain subject to state legislation. Currently, 22 states — including Oregon — lack anti-shackling laws to protect the health of pregnant prisoners and their newborns.

Methods: This study reviewed policy briefs, laws, and literature studying the practice of shackling incarcerated women during pregnancy to better understand the current legislative atmosphere around the issue and identify gaps in research. This study looked specifically at data from Oregon jails and prisons to inform the need for statewide anti-shackling legislation.

Results: In 2017, Oregon ranked 23rd out of 50 states for rate of female incarceration (~62/100,000 population), with approximately 1,200 women incarcerated across the state. Despite medical condemnation of shackling, and ten years after receiving a D grade regarding shackling, Oregon still lacks legislation regarding shackling of pregnant prisoners.

Conclusion: Although Oregon claims leadership regarding reproductive health, it remains among the states that do not have anti-shackling legislation. If Oregon is to maintain its moral credibility, legislators, healthcare professionals, and social justice advocates must come together to address this betrayal of public health.