Title of Presentation

Associations between military noise, chemical exposures, and auditory function in Service members and Veterans

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 5:52 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 5:56 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33755

Keywords

Audiometry, noise, hearing impairment, ototoxicity, tinnitus, Veterans, Service members

Abstract

Occupational noise and ototoxic chemical exposures are highly prevalent among military Service members and Veterans. Studies conducted in animal models and occupational settings suggest that noise and various chemical exposures may have an interactive effect on hearing impairment and tinnitus. However, studies in humans have been limited in number and sample size. The Noise Outcomes in Servicemembers Epidemiology (NOISE) Study follows active duty Service members and recently separated Veterans to evaluate the effects of various military and non-military exposures on auditory function. Our objective is to evaluate independent and joint associations between military occupational noise and chemical exposures and auditory function at baseline. This study will analyze baseline associations in a cohort of recently separated Veterans enrolled at the VA Portland Health Care System in Portland, OR and active duty Service members enrolled at the Department of Defense Hearing Center of Excellence in San Antonio, TX between 2014 and 2019. Noise and chemical exposures will be defined using responses to the Lifetime Exposure to Noise and Solvents Questionnaire (LENS-Q). Tinnitus outcomes will be defined using responses to six-question tinnitus screeners. Hearing impairment will be defined as a pure-tone average threshold greater than 20 decibels using data collected in baseline audiologic examinations. Statistical analyses will include multivariable log binomial regression and tests of interaction. Our study may provide one of the few analyses of interaction between noise and chemical exposures on hearing impairment and tinnitus with a large sample size in humans.

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Apr 7th, 5:52 PM Apr 7th, 5:56 PM

Associations between military noise, chemical exposures, and auditory function in Service members and Veterans

Occupational noise and ototoxic chemical exposures are highly prevalent among military Service members and Veterans. Studies conducted in animal models and occupational settings suggest that noise and various chemical exposures may have an interactive effect on hearing impairment and tinnitus. However, studies in humans have been limited in number and sample size. The Noise Outcomes in Servicemembers Epidemiology (NOISE) Study follows active duty Service members and recently separated Veterans to evaluate the effects of various military and non-military exposures on auditory function. Our objective is to evaluate independent and joint associations between military occupational noise and chemical exposures and auditory function at baseline. This study will analyze baseline associations in a cohort of recently separated Veterans enrolled at the VA Portland Health Care System in Portland, OR and active duty Service members enrolled at the Department of Defense Hearing Center of Excellence in San Antonio, TX between 2014 and 2019. Noise and chemical exposures will be defined using responses to the Lifetime Exposure to Noise and Solvents Questionnaire (LENS-Q). Tinnitus outcomes will be defined using responses to six-question tinnitus screeners. Hearing impairment will be defined as a pure-tone average threshold greater than 20 decibels using data collected in baseline audiologic examinations. Statistical analyses will include multivariable log binomial regression and tests of interaction. Our study may provide one of the few analyses of interaction between noise and chemical exposures on hearing impairment and tinnitus with a large sample size in humans.