Title of Presentation

Abuela, Mamá y Yo; Nutritional Resiliency for the Latinx Community

Presenter Biography

Briana Arnold received her Bachelor in Animal Sciences from Washington State University and found her path to public health after serving as a sustainable agriculture volunteer with the United State Peace Corps in Panama. There, she adopted her dog and cat and found a passion for food sovereignty and food justice. After Peace Corps and working in commercial production agriculture, she began to focus her work on sustainable food systems in the Portland, OR area. Briana now serves as a board member for Farmer's Market Fund, works through her MPH program with Familias en Accion as well at the Learning Gardens Lab.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Public Health/Environmental Systems and Human Health

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Event Website

https://www.familiasenaccion.org/

Start Date

7-4-2020 2:40 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 2:45 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33759

Keywords

Health equity, epigenetics, Latinx health, food deconolization, food sovereignty, maternal health

Abstract

With the Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) Moore Institute, Abuela, Mamá y Yo (AMY) was developed by Familias en Acción. AMY partners with Latinx families and Latinx-serving organizations to disseminate epigenetic research and the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) concept, promoting nutritional health equity in Oregon’s Latinx community. AMY is a science-based, multi-level intervention with the purpose of increasing nutritional resiliency in Latinx families, enhancing Latinx community capacity, and creating system-level change. The program has trained 120 community leader trainers across the state of Oregon through 10 TOT sessions. These leaders are currently facilitating the AMY curriculum, having completed 35 community classes since Fall 2019. These community classes emphasize healthy eating, impacts of stress on pregnancy, the first 1,000 days of life, epigenetics and generational impacts of stress, decolonization of food and food systems, and societal causes of lowered food access. In addition, AMY is constantly adapting to the needs of the community and learning from new community partnerships. To recognize this, AMY curriculum now includes community and culturally specific methods to improve family access to food. AMY will continue to adapt and change with new research and knowledge to best meet the needs of the Latinx community. Because AMY classes are currently being administered, evaluation is ongoing. Current evaluation processes include consolidating trainer and participant evaluations to identify themes across AMY classes. Once these themes are better disseminated, Familias en Acción plans to use the data to inform programmatic level change to increase curriculum efficacy.

Comments/Notes

Either oral or poster presentation OK, although poster preferred.

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Apr 7th, 2:40 PM Apr 7th, 2:45 PM

Abuela, Mamá y Yo; Nutritional Resiliency for the Latinx Community

With the Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) Moore Institute, Abuela, Mamá y Yo (AMY) was developed by Familias en Acción. AMY partners with Latinx families and Latinx-serving organizations to disseminate epigenetic research and the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) concept, promoting nutritional health equity in Oregon’s Latinx community. AMY is a science-based, multi-level intervention with the purpose of increasing nutritional resiliency in Latinx families, enhancing Latinx community capacity, and creating system-level change. The program has trained 120 community leader trainers across the state of Oregon through 10 TOT sessions. These leaders are currently facilitating the AMY curriculum, having completed 35 community classes since Fall 2019. These community classes emphasize healthy eating, impacts of stress on pregnancy, the first 1,000 days of life, epigenetics and generational impacts of stress, decolonization of food and food systems, and societal causes of lowered food access. In addition, AMY is constantly adapting to the needs of the community and learning from new community partnerships. To recognize this, AMY curriculum now includes community and culturally specific methods to improve family access to food. AMY will continue to adapt and change with new research and knowledge to best meet the needs of the Latinx community. Because AMY classes are currently being administered, evaluation is ongoing. Current evaluation processes include consolidating trainer and participant evaluations to identify themes across AMY classes. Once these themes are better disseminated, Familias en Acción plans to use the data to inform programmatic level change to increase curriculum efficacy.

https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/publichealthpdx/2020/Posters/5