Title of Presentation

Associations with Early Intervention Evaluation, Eligibility, and Services Engagement in a multi-site sample

Institution

PSU

Program/Major

BS Public Health Health Sciences and General Science

Degree

BS

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 2:46 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 2:51 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33760

Keywords

Child Development, Early Intervention, Eligibility, Development and Behavioral Pediatrics

Abstract

TITLE: Associations with Early Intervention Evaluation, Eligibility, and Services Engagement in a multi-site sample

Background: Parental concerns are usually highly predictive of child developmental delays; however, the relationship of parent concerns with Part C Early Intervention (EI) service use is unclear.

Objective: The goals of this project were to test the associations of parent concern presence, age of child at time of parent concerns, number of concerns, type of parental concern, and recency of parental concerns, with EI evaluation, eligibility, and services engagement after referral.

Design/Methods: We collected survey data on parent concerns, EI service use data, and family demographics from a sample of 483 children referred to EI in 2016-2018 from six Oregon primary care clinics serving lower income families as part of a developmental and autism screening intervention. Survey results were linked with Oregon EI database information, including if the child was evaluated, deemed eligible for services, and (if deemed eligible) whether they were engaged in services 6 months after referral. Bivariate testing and multivariable logistic regression were used to test the association of presence of parental concern, child age at time of concern, type of concern, number of concerns, and recency of concern, with EI evaluation, eligibility determination and engagement of services six months later.

Results: 483 children were referred to EI, 268 (55.5%) were evaluated, 85 (63.4% of evaluated) were found eligible, and 71 (85.5% of eligible) were engaged in services six months later. Among family demographic characteristics, boys were more likely to be evaluated than girls based on bivariate analysis but not on multivariable analysis (69.9% vs. 57.5%; p = 0.011). Presence of parent concern was strongly associated with evaluation on bivariate and multivariable analysis (67.3% versus 44.2%; aOR 5.32 [2.10-13.47]). Presence of parental concern was also associated with eligibility (63.4% versus 33.3%, p = 0.001), and service engagement (85.5% vs. 64.3%, p

Conclusion(s): Gender, presence of concern and recency of concern are associated with EI services use. Study results suggest that providers should assess presence of parent concern and provide additional support to parents who are not concerned at all or are concerned prior to the visit.

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Apr 7th, 2:46 PM Apr 7th, 2:51 PM

Associations with Early Intervention Evaluation, Eligibility, and Services Engagement in a multi-site sample

TITLE: Associations with Early Intervention Evaluation, Eligibility, and Services Engagement in a multi-site sample

Background: Parental concerns are usually highly predictive of child developmental delays; however, the relationship of parent concerns with Part C Early Intervention (EI) service use is unclear.

Objective: The goals of this project were to test the associations of parent concern presence, age of child at time of parent concerns, number of concerns, type of parental concern, and recency of parental concerns, with EI evaluation, eligibility, and services engagement after referral.

Design/Methods: We collected survey data on parent concerns, EI service use data, and family demographics from a sample of 483 children referred to EI in 2016-2018 from six Oregon primary care clinics serving lower income families as part of a developmental and autism screening intervention. Survey results were linked with Oregon EI database information, including if the child was evaluated, deemed eligible for services, and (if deemed eligible) whether they were engaged in services 6 months after referral. Bivariate testing and multivariable logistic regression were used to test the association of presence of parental concern, child age at time of concern, type of concern, number of concerns, and recency of concern, with EI evaluation, eligibility determination and engagement of services six months later.

Results: 483 children were referred to EI, 268 (55.5%) were evaluated, 85 (63.4% of evaluated) were found eligible, and 71 (85.5% of eligible) were engaged in services six months later. Among family demographic characteristics, boys were more likely to be evaluated than girls based on bivariate analysis but not on multivariable analysis (69.9% vs. 57.5%; p = 0.011). Presence of parent concern was strongly associated with evaluation on bivariate and multivariable analysis (67.3% versus 44.2%; aOR 5.32 [2.10-13.47]). Presence of parental concern was also associated with eligibility (63.4% versus 33.3%, p = 0.001), and service engagement (85.5% vs. 64.3%, p

Conclusion(s): Gender, presence of concern and recency of concern are associated with EI services use. Study results suggest that providers should assess presence of parent concern and provide additional support to parents who are not concerned at all or are concerned prior to the visit.