Title of Presentation

Oregon Longitudinal Child Abuse and Neglect Linkage Replication Project

Presenter Biography

Abigail Newby-Kew is a second year student in the doctoral Epidemiology program. She received her MPH from Boston University and spent five years working as a Maternal and Child Health Epidemiologist for the State of Alaska. She is specifically interested in postpartum and early childhood health, and how these experiences influence health outcomes throughout the life course.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

PhD

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2020 4:56 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 5:09 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33769

Keywords

child maltreatment, data linkage, ACES, retrospective cohort, PRAMS, child welfare, state partnership

Abstract

Child maltreatment, which includes abuse, neglect, and mental injury of a child by a parent or other caregiver, is associated with adverse health outcomes across the life course. The State of Alaska developed the Alaska Longitudinal Child Abuse and Neglect Linkage project (ALCANLink) to estimate the cumulative incidence of child maltreatment in Alaska and describe associated demographic and early childhood factors. This population-based cohort study is comprised of responses from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) linked to child welfare and other administrative data. ALCANLink estimates have been used to inform state-level policies, increase partnerships between public health and child welfare, and have provided substantive data to understand Adverse Childhood Experiences.

The ALCANLink team is partnering with the Oregon Health Authority and OHSU-PSU School of Public Health to replicate this methodology in Oregon. It requires limited resources and is a practical and efficient approach to studying the cumulative incidence of child maltreatment at the state level. However, organizational differences in state government can challenge the replication of system integration projects. This project will be used to validate the Alaska methodology and document the feasibility of replication within a state with a different organizational structure. The resulting cohort will be used to develop cumulative incidence estimates of child maltreatment and associated risk factors in Oregon and facilitate comparison with Alaska.

This presentation will focus on 1) the ALCANLink methodology, 2) key findings in Alaska, and 3) current progress and challenges in the Oregon replication 4) preliminary results for Oregon.

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Apr 7th, 4:56 PM Apr 7th, 5:09 PM

Oregon Longitudinal Child Abuse and Neglect Linkage Replication Project

Child maltreatment, which includes abuse, neglect, and mental injury of a child by a parent or other caregiver, is associated with adverse health outcomes across the life course. The State of Alaska developed the Alaska Longitudinal Child Abuse and Neglect Linkage project (ALCANLink) to estimate the cumulative incidence of child maltreatment in Alaska and describe associated demographic and early childhood factors. This population-based cohort study is comprised of responses from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) linked to child welfare and other administrative data. ALCANLink estimates have been used to inform state-level policies, increase partnerships between public health and child welfare, and have provided substantive data to understand Adverse Childhood Experiences.

The ALCANLink team is partnering with the Oregon Health Authority and OHSU-PSU School of Public Health to replicate this methodology in Oregon. It requires limited resources and is a practical and efficient approach to studying the cumulative incidence of child maltreatment at the state level. However, organizational differences in state government can challenge the replication of system integration projects. This project will be used to validate the Alaska methodology and document the feasibility of replication within a state with a different organizational structure. The resulting cohort will be used to develop cumulative incidence estimates of child maltreatment and associated risk factors in Oregon and facilitate comparison with Alaska.

This presentation will focus on 1) the ALCANLink methodology, 2) key findings in Alaska, and 3) current progress and challenges in the Oregon replication 4) preliminary results for Oregon.