Title of Presentation

Social and behavioral predictors of gestational weight gain: A review

Presenter Biography

Kalera Stratton is a second-year OHSU-PSU School of Public Health MPH Epidemiology student. She has an MS in Biology with a focus on neuroendocrine systems (hormones and behavior) from PSU, where she also attended for BS degrees in Biology and Psychology. She is currently working as a research assistant on the PROMISE study with Dr. Janne Boone-Heinonen, and as a part-time instructor teaching health education classes at Portland Community College and Columbia Gorge Community College. She will be matriculating into the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health PhD Epidemiology program in Fall 2021, and plans to study disparities in sexual and reproductive health.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-4-2021 2:53 PM

End Date

8-4-2021 2:58 PM

Keywords

Gestational Weight Gain, Perinatal health Disparities, Epidemiology, Birth records/birth certificates/vital statistics, Literature review

Abstract

Introduction: Associations between inadequate and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and adverse perinatal outcomes are well documented. Less is known about potential determinants of GWG.

Objective: To review empirical studies that treat GWG as an outcome and summarize the biological, behavioral, social, and environmental risk factors associated with GWG. Strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in the literature will be discussed.

Methods: This review was limited to observational studies published in English 2000-2020. Searches of Pubmed and Google Scholar eg. (gestational OR pregnancy) “weight gain” AND (“risk factor” OR predictor) identified 1062 papers, and from these, the title and abstract were used to identify 16 papers meeting inclusion criteria. Screeners abstracted key findings from each paper into a spreadsheet, and findings were compiled into categories.

Results: Race/ethnicity, family income, parity, maternal age, hypertension, alcohol consumption, smoking status, self-efficacy, paternal BMI, certain genetic variations, # prenatal visits, screen time, place, and if pregnancy was planned were found to be contributors to inadequate or excessive GWG. Few studies included mothers agemultiples.

Significance: This work will serve as a valuable guide for future researchers, policy makers, and program managers studying gestational weight gain, particularly in relation to vulnerable and understudied subgroups, in order to develop programs and policy to better address unmet needs.

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Apr 8th, 2:53 PM Apr 8th, 2:58 PM

Social and behavioral predictors of gestational weight gain: A review

Introduction: Associations between inadequate and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and adverse perinatal outcomes are well documented. Less is known about potential determinants of GWG.

Objective: To review empirical studies that treat GWG as an outcome and summarize the biological, behavioral, social, and environmental risk factors associated with GWG. Strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in the literature will be discussed.

Methods: This review was limited to observational studies published in English 2000-2020. Searches of Pubmed and Google Scholar eg. (gestational OR pregnancy) “weight gain” AND (“risk factor” OR predictor) identified 1062 papers, and from these, the title and abstract were used to identify 16 papers meeting inclusion criteria. Screeners abstracted key findings from each paper into a spreadsheet, and findings were compiled into categories.

Results: Race/ethnicity, family income, parity, maternal age, hypertension, alcohol consumption, smoking status, self-efficacy, paternal BMI, certain genetic variations, # prenatal visits, screen time, place, and if pregnancy was planned were found to be contributors to inadequate or excessive GWG. Few studies included mothers agemultiples.

Significance: This work will serve as a valuable guide for future researchers, policy makers, and program managers studying gestational weight gain, particularly in relation to vulnerable and understudied subgroups, in order to develop programs and policy to better address unmet needs.