Presenter Biography

Undergraduate student pursuing a BS in Health Sciences; Health Studies, aspiring physician scientist.

Institution

PSU

Program/Major

Pre-Clinical Health Science

Degree

BS

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-4-2021 3:03 PM

End Date

8-4-2021 3:08 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35574

Keywords

Developmental Delays; WIC; Early Intervention; Early Childhood Special Education

Abstract

Background: Low-income children are at risk for under-detection of developmental disabilities DD. WIC clinics see low-income children regularly in early childhood and could be an important source of referrals to developmental services.

Objectives: To increase the number of referrals to EI/ECSE from non-primary care settings such as WIC.

Methods: This was a site-randomized trial of an intervention to train WIC staff in early identification of DD’s, using CDC’s LTSAE developmental monitoring materials. 7 county WIC agencies in Oregon enrolled; 4 intervention agencies and 3 control agencies. The intervention consisted of an on-site, half-day training regarding signs of developmental delays, use of LTSAE materials, and referral to EI/ECSE. WIC staff were encouraged to identify and refer at-risk children to EI/ECSE. Control sites received no training and continued their usual processes. Primary study outcome was number of children referred from WIC to EI/ECSE in control vs. experimental counties as well as % of referrals evaluated based on data obtained Oregon’s EI/ECSE program.

Results: Data for 46 children referred to EI/ECSE were obtained. Overall, 3 of 4 intervention sites increased their referrals to EI, and 0 of 3 control sites increased referrals. Total referrals in the intervention arm increased from 5 to 33 in the intervention arm, but decreased from 6 to 2 in the control arm.

Conclusion: This brief intervention with WIC staff led to short-term increases in EI referrals and evaluations.

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Apr 8th, 3:03 PM Apr 8th, 3:08 PM

An Intervention to Increase Detection of Developmental Delays in WIC Programs

Background: Low-income children are at risk for under-detection of developmental disabilities DD. WIC clinics see low-income children regularly in early childhood and could be an important source of referrals to developmental services.

Objectives: To increase the number of referrals to EI/ECSE from non-primary care settings such as WIC.

Methods: This was a site-randomized trial of an intervention to train WIC staff in early identification of DD’s, using CDC’s LTSAE developmental monitoring materials. 7 county WIC agencies in Oregon enrolled; 4 intervention agencies and 3 control agencies. The intervention consisted of an on-site, half-day training regarding signs of developmental delays, use of LTSAE materials, and referral to EI/ECSE. WIC staff were encouraged to identify and refer at-risk children to EI/ECSE. Control sites received no training and continued their usual processes. Primary study outcome was number of children referred from WIC to EI/ECSE in control vs. experimental counties as well as % of referrals evaluated based on data obtained Oregon’s EI/ECSE program.

Results: Data for 46 children referred to EI/ECSE were obtained. Overall, 3 of 4 intervention sites increased their referrals to EI, and 0 of 3 control sites increased referrals. Total referrals in the intervention arm increased from 5 to 33 in the intervention arm, but decreased from 6 to 2 in the control arm.

Conclusion: This brief intervention with WIC staff led to short-term increases in EI referrals and evaluations.