Presenter Information

Christina JäderholmFollow

Presenter Biography

Community Health PhD-student at OHSU-PSU School of Public Health

My research interests spans perinatal and infant health, particularly in rural Oregon. I’m interested in the role of trauma and adversity in pregnancy health, birth outcome and infant health, and how to promote health through trauma informed approaches.

I have worked at OHSU’s Community Research hub in Bend for almost 3 years, and participated in a variety of community engaged research projects. I enjoy working alongside rural communities and cherish the knowledge share and social connections that comes from it.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Community Health

Degree

PhD

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

8-4-2021 3:08 PM

End Date

8-4-2021 3:13 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35575

Keywords

Rural Health, CRA

Abstract

Background

To assess five rural Oregon counties’ readiness to take action towards conducting health-related research within their communities, we conducted a Community Readiness Assessment as a process towards reconciling research aims with community priorities and shared resources.

Results were used to guide OHSU’s clinical researchers with plans to implement an exercise-based pilot program for cancer survivors and their partners in Oregon’s rural counties.

Method

The Community Readiness Assessment (CRA) is a validated interviews-based tool for measuring attitudes, knowledge, beliefs and shared resources within communities; Here, as it relates to health-related research. The 36 open-ended questions were administered to 15 community leaders and stakeholders in five rural counties in Oregon. The CRA produced scores for each county in five distinct areas of interest. Additionally, the interviews presented an opportunity to examine qualitative results from the answers.

Findings

The individual community scores revealed strength and weaknesses within community organizing and capacity: One county was found to be more resourceful and already have the infrastructure to conduct community engaged health-related research, while another had great strength in volunteer power and physical spaces but seeking the necessary leadership to move efforts forward. Lastly, barriers such as mistrust, internet access and transportation were identified as hindering optimal community participation in some existing efforts.

Conclusion

The CRA provided important and useful information about the priorities, knowledge and shared resources in rural Oregon when it comes to conducting health related research. This will guide OHSU’s cancer intervention researchers as they implement a new exercise-based program across Oregon.

Included in

Public Health Commons

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Apr 8th, 3:08 PM Apr 8th, 3:13 PM

CRA to Inform Health Related Research in Rural Oregon

Background

To assess five rural Oregon counties’ readiness to take action towards conducting health-related research within their communities, we conducted a Community Readiness Assessment as a process towards reconciling research aims with community priorities and shared resources.

Results were used to guide OHSU’s clinical researchers with plans to implement an exercise-based pilot program for cancer survivors and their partners in Oregon’s rural counties.

Method

The Community Readiness Assessment (CRA) is a validated interviews-based tool for measuring attitudes, knowledge, beliefs and shared resources within communities; Here, as it relates to health-related research. The 36 open-ended questions were administered to 15 community leaders and stakeholders in five rural counties in Oregon. The CRA produced scores for each county in five distinct areas of interest. Additionally, the interviews presented an opportunity to examine qualitative results from the answers.

Findings

The individual community scores revealed strength and weaknesses within community organizing and capacity: One county was found to be more resourceful and already have the infrastructure to conduct community engaged health-related research, while another had great strength in volunteer power and physical spaces but seeking the necessary leadership to move efforts forward. Lastly, barriers such as mistrust, internet access and transportation were identified as hindering optimal community participation in some existing efforts.

Conclusion

The CRA provided important and useful information about the priorities, knowledge and shared resources in rural Oregon when it comes to conducting health related research. This will guide OHSU’s cancer intervention researchers as they implement a new exercise-based program across Oregon.