Title of Presentation

Lifetime smoking history and prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone density in U.S. adults, NHANES 2005-2010

Presenter Biography

Molly Joyce is a second-year MPH student in the Epidemiology program at OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. She received her BS in Biochemistry (Pre-Med) from Portland State University. Her current research interests include injury and chronic disease epidemiology, with a special focus on mild traumatic brain injuries and their later-in-life outcomes. She is currently interning at the Portland VA, aiding in research on the impact of opioid and other medication use on the proposed relationship between traumatic brain injuries and neurodegenerative disorders with Dr. Kathleen Carlson. In addition, she is being mentored by Dr. Avinash Chandran, the Director of NCAA Injury Surveillance Program at Datalys, on injury surveillance research among college and high school athletes with a focus on sports-related concussions.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

6-4-2022 1:57 PM

End Date

6-4-2022 2:08 PM

Keywords

Bone health, smoking, and NHANES

Abstract

Lifetime smoking history and prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone density in U.S. adults, NHANES 2005-2010

Austin R Thompson, BS1,2 ¶

Molly Joyce, BS1 ¶

Kalera Stratton, MPH, MS1

Eric S Orwoll, MD3

Hans L Carlson, MD2

Nels L Carlson, MD2

Lynn M Marshall, ScD1

Austin R Thompson and Molly Joyce contributed equally to this work

1School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA

2Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA

3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA


Abstract

Background

Osteoporosis and low bone density are common among older adults; women are more likely to have osteoporosis and low bone density than men. The prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone density varies with race/ethnicity, with the greatest prevalence being among non-Hispanic, Asian women. Prior studies identified a negative association between smoking and changes in bone mineral density; however, the association between smoking and osteoporosis or low bone density has not been investigated according to race/ethnicity.

Materials and methods

This study utilized National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2005-2010. In this study 4,226 U.S. adults aged 50 years or older had complete information on smoking history, bone mineral density measurements, and other independent variables. Survey design-based multinomial logistic regression was utilized to identify if lifetime smoking history, measured in pack-years, was associated with osteoporosis and low bone density, stratified by sex and race/ethnicity.

Results

Among women, the highest lifetime smoking history (≥30 pack-years) was positively associated with the prevalence of osteoporosis [POR: 2.40 (95% CI: 1.42, 4.06)] and did not substantially differ according to race/ethnicity. Though not statistically significant, the highest lifetime smoking history was also positively associated with the prevalence of low bone density among women [POR: 1.21 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.82)].

Conclusion

Women with the greatest lifetime smoking history were 2.4 times as likely to have osteoporosis as women that never smoked. Despite differences in prevalence of osteoporosis according to race or ethnicity, this association did not substantially differ in magnitude across races or ethnicities among women.

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Apr 6th, 1:57 PM Apr 6th, 2:08 PM

Lifetime smoking history and prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone density in U.S. adults, NHANES 2005-2010

Lifetime smoking history and prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone density in U.S. adults, NHANES 2005-2010

Austin R Thompson, BS1,2 ¶

Molly Joyce, BS1 ¶

Kalera Stratton, MPH, MS1

Eric S Orwoll, MD3

Hans L Carlson, MD2

Nels L Carlson, MD2

Lynn M Marshall, ScD1

Austin R Thompson and Molly Joyce contributed equally to this work

1School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA

2Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA

3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA


Abstract

Background

Osteoporosis and low bone density are common among older adults; women are more likely to have osteoporosis and low bone density than men. The prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone density varies with race/ethnicity, with the greatest prevalence being among non-Hispanic, Asian women. Prior studies identified a negative association between smoking and changes in bone mineral density; however, the association between smoking and osteoporosis or low bone density has not been investigated according to race/ethnicity.

Materials and methods

This study utilized National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2005-2010. In this study 4,226 U.S. adults aged 50 years or older had complete information on smoking history, bone mineral density measurements, and other independent variables. Survey design-based multinomial logistic regression was utilized to identify if lifetime smoking history, measured in pack-years, was associated with osteoporosis and low bone density, stratified by sex and race/ethnicity.

Results

Among women, the highest lifetime smoking history (≥30 pack-years) was positively associated with the prevalence of osteoporosis [POR: 2.40 (95% CI: 1.42, 4.06)] and did not substantially differ according to race/ethnicity. Though not statistically significant, the highest lifetime smoking history was also positively associated with the prevalence of low bone density among women [POR: 1.21 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.82)].

Conclusion

Women with the greatest lifetime smoking history were 2.4 times as likely to have osteoporosis as women that never smoked. Despite differences in prevalence of osteoporosis according to race or ethnicity, this association did not substantially differ in magnitude across races or ethnicities among women.