Title of Presentation

Trauma stabilization points and humanitarian emergencies: implications for disaster and mass casualty incident response systems in the United States

Presenter Biography

Daniel Solchanyk is an MSGH candidate at Northwestern University and completing a second BS at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. He is currently a graduate research assistant at the Havey Institute for Global Health at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and his research interests include global health education and care delivery in conflict and post-conflict settings.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Public Health Studies

Degree

MSGH

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

6-4-2022 12:27 PM

End Date

6-4-2022 12:38 PM

Keywords

Complex Humanitarian Emergencies, Trauma, Mass Casualty Incident, Triage

Abstract

Trauma stabilization points (TSPs) are mobile trauma clinics that are located very close (< 5 kM/10 minutes) to the point of injury or mass casualty incident. These temporary clinics are staffed by doctors, nurses and/or paramedics and are designed to rapidly triage, treat and transfer patients. TSPs are now increasingly being used by a diverse set of global health organizations to respond to humanitarian emergencies, most notably in Mosul, Iraq and the Gaza Strip. Recent research has highlighted several promising outcomes associated with the use of TSPs, including decreased mortality and increased emergency health system optimization. In the United States, emergency response and management systems continue to grapple with how best to respond to mass casualty incidents such as natural disasters and active shooter events. Significant gaps associated with interagency coordination and prehospital emergency treatment are widespread within current response frameworks. Integrating TSPs into a complete mass casualty incident response plan represents a novel solution that aims to improve patient outcomes, strengthen interagency coordination and facilitate efficient transport resource allocation. Positioning advanced emergency clinicians close to the point of injury ensures the rapid treatment and stabilization of critical patients, while also allowing for the discharge of patients with relatively minor injuries that would otherwise further burden strained ambulance and hospital resources. TSPs constitute a potentially valuable adjunct to current mass casualty incident response strategies and future in-depth studies are needed to assess their utility within the United States.

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Apr 6th, 12:27 PM Apr 6th, 12:38 PM

Trauma stabilization points and humanitarian emergencies: implications for disaster and mass casualty incident response systems in the United States

Trauma stabilization points (TSPs) are mobile trauma clinics that are located very close (< 5 kM/10 minutes) to the point of injury or mass casualty incident. These temporary clinics are staffed by doctors, nurses and/or paramedics and are designed to rapidly triage, treat and transfer patients. TSPs are now increasingly being used by a diverse set of global health organizations to respond to humanitarian emergencies, most notably in Mosul, Iraq and the Gaza Strip. Recent research has highlighted several promising outcomes associated with the use of TSPs, including decreased mortality and increased emergency health system optimization. In the United States, emergency response and management systems continue to grapple with how best to respond to mass casualty incidents such as natural disasters and active shooter events. Significant gaps associated with interagency coordination and prehospital emergency treatment are widespread within current response frameworks. Integrating TSPs into a complete mass casualty incident response plan represents a novel solution that aims to improve patient outcomes, strengthen interagency coordination and facilitate efficient transport resource allocation. Positioning advanced emergency clinicians close to the point of injury ensures the rapid treatment and stabilization of critical patients, while also allowing for the discharge of patients with relatively minor injuries that would otherwise further burden strained ambulance and hospital resources. TSPs constitute a potentially valuable adjunct to current mass casualty incident response strategies and future in-depth studies are needed to assess their utility within the United States.