Title of Presentation

History of Hypertension and Urinary Incontinence among adults aged 40 and older: A cross-sectional study from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Presenter Biography

Karla Cordova Nicolas is currently a student at OHSU-PSU school of Public Health in the MPH-Epidemiology program. She received her bachelor’s degree from Pacific University in Public Health.

Puthyda Keath is a Cambodian graduate student at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health in the MPH-Epidemiology program.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-4-2023 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2023 3:00 PM

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Keywords

blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, urinary incontinence, urology

Abstract

Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI) impacts over 200 million individuals world-wide, though little is known about the causes of this condition. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine prevalence of UI and the association between a history of hypertension and UI in older adults. A secondary aim was to determine if sex modified the association between history of hypertension and UI.

Methods: This study utilized data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2016 cycles. We included 9,717 U.S adults (≥40 years) with complete information on history of hypertension, UI and other independent variables. Participants with UI who self-reported having a hypertension history were compared to participants with UI who did not have a hypertension history. Logistic regression was performed for the association between a history of hypertension and UI.

Results: Among our study sample, UI prevalence was 43.9% (95%CI: 42.3, 45.6). Among those with a history of hypertension, the odds of having UI are 1.40 times the odds of having UI in those with no history of hypertension (95%CI: 1.23, 1.58). After adjusting for confounders, there was no statistically significant association found between having a history of hypertension and UI among males or females.

Conclusion: Our results indicate no apparent association between having a history of hypertension and UI between males and females. Thus, to identify populations with UI, more studies are needed examining the association in both males and females.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

History of Hypertension and Urinary Incontinence among adults aged 40 and older: A cross-sectional study from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI) impacts over 200 million individuals world-wide, though little is known about the causes of this condition. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine prevalence of UI and the association between a history of hypertension and UI in older adults. A secondary aim was to determine if sex modified the association between history of hypertension and UI.

Methods: This study utilized data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2016 cycles. We included 9,717 U.S adults (≥40 years) with complete information on history of hypertension, UI and other independent variables. Participants with UI who self-reported having a hypertension history were compared to participants with UI who did not have a hypertension history. Logistic regression was performed for the association between a history of hypertension and UI.

Results: Among our study sample, UI prevalence was 43.9% (95%CI: 42.3, 45.6). Among those with a history of hypertension, the odds of having UI are 1.40 times the odds of having UI in those with no history of hypertension (95%CI: 1.23, 1.58). After adjusting for confounders, there was no statistically significant association found between having a history of hypertension and UI among males or females.

Conclusion: Our results indicate no apparent association between having a history of hypertension and UI between males and females. Thus, to identify populations with UI, more studies are needed examining the association in both males and females.