Start Date

2-5-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

2-5-2013 10:15 AM

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History

Abstract

At the 1954 Geneva Conference, five standing world powers attempted to come to a resolution on the ongoing violence in Indochina—a military conflict in small, economically-insignificant nations including Vietnam which ultimately became a microcosm for the political and military divide between communism and capitalism around the world. In this paper, I argue that the refusal of the United States' delegation to sign the conference's accords signals a fundamental shift towards radicalism in American policy and ultimately foreshadows their defeat during the Vietnam War.

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May 2nd, 9:00 AM May 2nd, 10:15 AM

Fear and Loathing in Indochina: An analysis of the American refusal to sign the Geneva Accords, 1954

At the 1954 Geneva Conference, five standing world powers attempted to come to a resolution on the ongoing violence in Indochina—a military conflict in small, economically-insignificant nations including Vietnam which ultimately became a microcosm for the political and military divide between communism and capitalism around the world. In this paper, I argue that the refusal of the United States' delegation to sign the conference's accords signals a fundamental shift towards radicalism in American policy and ultimately foreshadows their defeat during the Vietnam War.