Presenter Information

Kevin Rhine, Clackamas High School

Start Date

2-5-2013 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2013 11:45 AM

Disciplines

History

Abstract

This paper discusses Corinth's role in both directly persuading and indirectly maneuvering Sparta to declare war on Athens. Fashioning such a plan required Corinth to convert Sparta from an outright isolationist to a reluctant ally. Yet, as one of the lone third-party states in Greece, Corinth needed to single-handedly persuade a much larger and more important city-state. Although most scholarship tends to focus on the two major city-states, this paper suggests that third-party states like Corinth may have had a much greater role than previously thought in shaping the course of the Peloponnesian War. As the key player in forcing Sparta to declare war, Corinth steered the considerably more powerful Sparta to war not once, but twice-a testament to their truly conniving diplomatic gambit.

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 11:45 AM

Corinth as a Catalyst Before and During the Peloponnesian War

This paper discusses Corinth's role in both directly persuading and indirectly maneuvering Sparta to declare war on Athens. Fashioning such a plan required Corinth to convert Sparta from an outright isolationist to a reluctant ally. Yet, as one of the lone third-party states in Greece, Corinth needed to single-handedly persuade a much larger and more important city-state. Although most scholarship tends to focus on the two major city-states, this paper suggests that third-party states like Corinth may have had a much greater role than previously thought in shaping the course of the Peloponnesian War. As the key player in forcing Sparta to declare war, Corinth steered the considerably more powerful Sparta to war not once, but twice-a testament to their truly conniving diplomatic gambit.