Presenter Information

Claire Martin, St Mary's Academy

Start Date

2-5-2013 10:30 AM

End Date

2-5-2013 11:45 AM

Disciplines

European History | History

Abstract

During the volatile period, 1789 to 1795, many of the concepts that made up the backbone of the French Identity were challenged. While thousands of ew-aged French subjects protested, groups of impassioned revolutionaries met the call for change. Although these groups shared the common goal ofliberty for the French people, they differed greatly in their visions for the hazy future of France. By the end of 1792, two competing schools of thought would emerge as the primary political parties of the new state: a sect of zealous radicals, known as the Jacobins, and a sect of moderate radicals, known as the Girondin. Though almost congruous at the outset of the Revolution, these two political factions quickly divided and solidified into the two primary political opponents of the New Age. This paper investigates how the totality of this conflict culminated in young Girondist Charlotte Corday's assassination of prominent revolutionary writer and Jacobin supporter, Jean-Pa Marat.

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9454

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May 2nd, 10:30 AM May 2nd, 11:45 AM

Friend of the People, Enemy to the Cause: Jean Paul Marat, Charlotte Corday, and the Consolidation of Jacobin Power in Revolutionary France

During the volatile period, 1789 to 1795, many of the concepts that made up the backbone of the French Identity were challenged. While thousands of ew-aged French subjects protested, groups of impassioned revolutionaries met the call for change. Although these groups shared the common goal ofliberty for the French people, they differed greatly in their visions for the hazy future of France. By the end of 1792, two competing schools of thought would emerge as the primary political parties of the new state: a sect of zealous radicals, known as the Jacobins, and a sect of moderate radicals, known as the Girondin. Though almost congruous at the outset of the Revolution, these two political factions quickly divided and solidified into the two primary political opponents of the New Age. This paper investigates how the totality of this conflict culminated in young Girondist Charlotte Corday's assassination of prominent revolutionary writer and Jacobin supporter, Jean-Pa Marat.