Presenter Information

Sophia Cantwell, St. Mary's Academy

Start Date

29-4-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2014 10:15 AM

Disciplines

European History | Social History

Subjects

Jewish refugees -- Great Britain, Jewish Holocaust (1939-1945), World War (1939-1945), Kindertransports (Rescue operations) -- Great Britain

Abstract

The Kindertransport was a program implemented by Britain throughout Europe during World War II to save thousands of persecuted Jewish children. While the British Parliament ultimately passed the movement as a bill and allowed it, the credit and work behind the movement belongs to the Quakers and various Jewish figures of authority in Britain. This paper explores the birth of this movement, its successes and struggles, and its lasting impact on the world today. Without the determination of a few willing people, thousands of lives would have perished during World War II.

Notes

Winner of the Karen E. Hoppes Young Historians Award for Outstanding Research and Writing.

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© Copyright the author(s)

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35792

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Apr 29th, 9:00 AM Apr 29th, 10:15 AM

The Power of the People in Influencing the British Government: The Kindertransport

The Kindertransport was a program implemented by Britain throughout Europe during World War II to save thousands of persecuted Jewish children. While the British Parliament ultimately passed the movement as a bill and allowed it, the credit and work behind the movement belongs to the Quakers and various Jewish figures of authority in Britain. This paper explores the birth of this movement, its successes and struggles, and its lasting impact on the world today. Without the determination of a few willing people, thousands of lives would have perished during World War II.