Event Title

The Dangers of the Spanish Lady: War, Medicine, and Leadership as Contributing Factors to the Spanish Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919

Start Date

29-4-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2014 2:15 PM

Disciplines

Health Policy | History of Science, Technology, and Medicine | Influenza Humans | United States History

Subjects

Influenza Epidemic (1918-1919), Influenza -- History, Influenza -- United States -- History -- 20th century

Abstract

The Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 rocked the world as the deadliest epidemic of all time, yet this powerful disease has been largely overlooked in historical discussion because it lacks the dynamic nature of The Great War. A closer look at the epidemic reveals that it was so deadly precisely because it lacked that dynamic nature. The flu’s onset was insidious, and the combination of war, lack of medical knowledge, and poor leadership ultimately conspired to allow the disease to devastate America.

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35794

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 2:15 PM

The Dangers of the Spanish Lady: War, Medicine, and Leadership as Contributing Factors to the Spanish Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919

The Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 rocked the world as the deadliest epidemic of all time, yet this powerful disease has been largely overlooked in historical discussion because it lacks the dynamic nature of The Great War. A closer look at the epidemic reveals that it was so deadly precisely because it lacked that dynamic nature. The flu’s onset was insidious, and the combination of war, lack of medical knowledge, and poor leadership ultimately conspired to allow the disease to devastate America.