Start Date

28-4-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Cultural History | Curriculum and Instruction | United States History

Subjects

Curriculum change -- United States, Education -- Social aspects -- United States, Cold War -- Social aspects -- United States

Abstract

The Cold War era had a dramatic impact on the American educational system. Striving to demonstrate superiority over Soviet counterparts, new curriculum were developed to prepare the American youth intellectually, emotionally, and technologically to position the U.S. as a world power. With the American public polarized whether schools were a venue for the dissemination of national ideologies or institutions for the development of critical thinking; world events including nuclear warfare, space exploration, and military preparedness served as catalysts for the development of future citizens that would effectively contribute to the intellectual and technological growth of the nation.

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17283

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Apr 28th, 9:00 AM Apr 28th, 10:15 AM

Crisis in Education -- The Effect of the Cold War on the American Education System

The Cold War era had a dramatic impact on the American educational system. Striving to demonstrate superiority over Soviet counterparts, new curriculum were developed to prepare the American youth intellectually, emotionally, and technologically to position the U.S. as a world power. With the American public polarized whether schools were a venue for the dissemination of national ideologies or institutions for the development of critical thinking; world events including nuclear warfare, space exploration, and military preparedness served as catalysts for the development of future citizens that would effectively contribute to the intellectual and technological growth of the nation.