Start Date

20-4-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Gender and Sexuality | Medieval History

Subjects

Judith M. Bennett -- Criticism and interpretation, Lesbians -- History -- Medieval (500-1500), Homosexuality -- History, Values -- Religious aspects

Abstract

Sexuality, particularly homosexuality, in the Middle Ages was heavily enshrouded by a culture saturated in religious values. Coupled with a lack of voice of women in this time, it is no wonder that evidence of lesbians is sparse. In lieu of this, historian Judith M. Bennett has offered the classification of a “lesbian-like” woman. This paper not only supports her assertion, but also offers the example of author Bietris de Romans as a “lesbian-like” woman.

Rights

© Copyright the author(s)

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19797

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:15 AM

Lesbians in the Middle Ages: Bietris de Romans

Sexuality, particularly homosexuality, in the Middle Ages was heavily enshrouded by a culture saturated in religious values. Coupled with a lack of voice of women in this time, it is no wonder that evidence of lesbians is sparse. In lieu of this, historian Judith M. Bennett has offered the classification of a “lesbian-like” woman. This paper not only supports her assertion, but also offers the example of author Bietris de Romans as a “lesbian-like” woman.