Start Date

20-4-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

20-4-2017 11:45 AM

Disciplines

History of Science, Technology, and Medicine | Scholarly Communication

Subjects

Royal Society (Great Britain). Philosophical transactions -- Rhetoric -- Analysis, Scientific writing -- History -- Analysis

Abstract

King Charles II of England gave birth to the Royal Society and the right for it to publish without interference in the seventeenth century. Out of this society came forth Philosophical Transactions, the first ever science journal. The journal, however, was not strictly bound to science. Articles within the journal exhibit a variety of unusual bits of information ranging from making water colors to constructing a bee-house. This paper shows that the Royal Society included articles that weren’t science but human interest to gather a following for themselves.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19796

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Apr 20th, 10:30 AM Apr 20th, 11:45 AM

Clickbait Science: A Review of Rhetorical Patterns Within the Royal Society

King Charles II of England gave birth to the Royal Society and the right for it to publish without interference in the seventeenth century. Out of this society came forth Philosophical Transactions, the first ever science journal. The journal, however, was not strictly bound to science. Articles within the journal exhibit a variety of unusual bits of information ranging from making water colors to constructing a bee-house. This paper shows that the Royal Society included articles that weren’t science but human interest to gather a following for themselves.