Start Date

1-5-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2019 1:15 PM

Disciplines

United States History

Subjects

Delphine Lalaurie -- Influence, Race relations -- United States -- History, African Americans -- Race identity

Abstract

The paper covers the history of Madame LaLaurie, and the public reaction of New Orleans in response to her slave abuse. The paper reviews the social climate between New Orleans Americans and the French Creole society, in which LaLaurie was included in. The rivalry between the two groups influenced the widespread hatred for LaLaurie. The paper addresses the extremity of her abuse of her slaves, and the psychological theories that could have allowed for her behavior. The public reaction to the crimes is considered as well, whereas the New Orleanians developed mob mentality in an attack on LaLaurie's house. The paper argues that there was such a violent response because it was inconceivable to the public that these crimes could be committed by a woman.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28510

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May 1st, 12:30 PM May 1st, 1:15 PM

The Radical Impact of Madame Delphine Lalaurie on Slavery and the Image of African Americans, 1831-1840

The paper covers the history of Madame LaLaurie, and the public reaction of New Orleans in response to her slave abuse. The paper reviews the social climate between New Orleans Americans and the French Creole society, in which LaLaurie was included in. The rivalry between the two groups influenced the widespread hatred for LaLaurie. The paper addresses the extremity of her abuse of her slaves, and the psychological theories that could have allowed for her behavior. The public reaction to the crimes is considered as well, whereas the New Orleanians developed mob mentality in an attack on LaLaurie's house. The paper argues that there was such a violent response because it was inconceivable to the public that these crimes could be committed by a woman.