Start Date

27-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2020 10:00 AM

Disciplines

Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | History | Italian Language and Literature

Subjects

Catherine de Médicis (Queen consort of Henry II King of France : 1519-1589), Women -- History -- 16th century, France -- History -- 16th century -- Historiography

Description

Catherine de’ Medici is commonly known and referred to by historians as an “Evil queen”. This paper aims to examine how her reputation has been built upon legend and myth rather than fact. It explores how sixteenth century Europe’s overwhelming patriarchal prejudice and bias, along with an underlying presence of Xenophobia, has influenced the conclusion many historians have made about Medici. Rather, Catherine de’ Medici was a strategic ruler whose goal was to maintain peace at all cost during a religiously trying time. Through the commentary of a sixteenth century anonymous European writer, the paper aims to show that Medici has been a victim of these prejudices, and to show how her evil narrative has been exonerated by many recent historians and authors in the late 20th century, and early 21st century.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33113

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM Apr 27th, 10:00 AM

Catherine de' Medici: The Crafting of an Evil Legend

Catherine de’ Medici is commonly known and referred to by historians as an “Evil queen”. This paper aims to examine how her reputation has been built upon legend and myth rather than fact. It explores how sixteenth century Europe’s overwhelming patriarchal prejudice and bias, along with an underlying presence of Xenophobia, has influenced the conclusion many historians have made about Medici. Rather, Catherine de’ Medici was a strategic ruler whose goal was to maintain peace at all cost during a religiously trying time. Through the commentary of a sixteenth century anonymous European writer, the paper aims to show that Medici has been a victim of these prejudices, and to show how her evil narrative has been exonerated by many recent historians and authors in the late 20th century, and early 21st century.