Start Date

19-5-2021 1:20 PM

End Date

19-5-2021 2:35 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Rogue River Indian War (1855-1856), Indians of North America -- Oregon -- Government relations, Siletz Indian Reservation (Or.) -- History

Description

The Rogue River War of 1855 to 1856 was a series of armed conflicts fought between U.S. Army regulars, local militia, and a conglomerate of indigenous groups in the Rogue River watershed. The main cause of the conflict was the intrusion of white settlers and miners into the territory of the indigenous people of the Rogue River. These white immigrants misused resources upon which the local indigenous people relied and violently retaliated against local indigenous people for misdeeds they often did not commit. The Lupton Massacre, Battle of Hungry Hill, and the Battle of Big Bend serve as critical points in this war which represented the end of any effective indigenous resistance to white control of Oregon lands.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35801

Included in

History Commons

Share

COinS
 
May 19th, 1:20 PM May 19th, 2:35 PM

Session 1: Panel 1: Presenter 2 (Paper) -- The Rogue River War 1855-1856

The Rogue River War of 1855 to 1856 was a series of armed conflicts fought between U.S. Army regulars, local militia, and a conglomerate of indigenous groups in the Rogue River watershed. The main cause of the conflict was the intrusion of white settlers and miners into the territory of the indigenous people of the Rogue River. These white immigrants misused resources upon which the local indigenous people relied and violently retaliated against local indigenous people for misdeeds they often did not commit. The Lupton Massacre, Battle of Hungry Hill, and the Battle of Big Bend serve as critical points in this war which represented the end of any effective indigenous resistance to white control of Oregon lands.