Start Date

25-4-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2022 12:00 PM

Disciplines

European History | History | Military History

Subjects

Deception -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century, Operation Mincemeat, World War (1939-1945) -- Secret service -- Great Britain

Abstract

In 1943, during the height of the Second World War, the dead body of a man in his early thirties was released from HMS Seraph submarine off the southwest coast of Spain. This corpse carried fabricated letters outlining the Allies’ plan to attack Greece and Sardinia which convinced German forces to defend Greece and move away from the real target, Sicily. This successful, radical, and deceptive operation led by Ewen Montegue to disguise the Allied Invasion of Sicily using false-intelligence tactics forwarded the Allied victory and increased the prevalence of deception in war. This paper explores Operation Mincemeat’s revolutionary nature, the significance of its success, and its relevance today.

Rights

© 2022 Maya N. DaSilva

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37623

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Apr 25th, 9:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Operation Mincemeat: The Impact and Influence of WWII’s Most Daring Intelligence Operation

In 1943, during the height of the Second World War, the dead body of a man in his early thirties was released from HMS Seraph submarine off the southwest coast of Spain. This corpse carried fabricated letters outlining the Allies’ plan to attack Greece and Sardinia which convinced German forces to defend Greece and move away from the real target, Sicily. This successful, radical, and deceptive operation led by Ewen Montegue to disguise the Allied Invasion of Sicily using false-intelligence tactics forwarded the Allied victory and increased the prevalence of deception in war. This paper explores Operation Mincemeat’s revolutionary nature, the significance of its success, and its relevance today.