Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 2:00 PM

Subjects

Teachers -- Rating of, Student evaluation of teachers, Calculus

Description

Over the past decade, numerous reports point to the need for national efforts to increase the number of students pursuing and professionals with degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields (see for example NSB, 2007; PCAST, 2012; Thomasian, 2011). According to the PCAST report (2012) increasing the retention rate of the students who enter college intending to major in a STEM field has the potential to significantly decrease the gap between the number of STEM degrees produced and the projected number of STEM degrees needed to sustain the United States position in the global market. While there are many reasons students leave STEM fields, there is a growing body of research that suggests that intending STEM students are switching out of STEM fields due to experiences in their introductory mathematics courses (Ellis, Kelton, & Rasmussen, 2014; PCAST, 2012; Rasmussen & Ellis, 2013), including experiencing poor instruction (Bressoud, Mesa, & Rasmussen, 2015; Seymour & Hewitt, 1997). In the United States each year over 300,000 students enroll in tertiary Calculus, many of which are just beginning their post- secondary education (Blair, Kirkman, Maxwell, 2013; Bressoud, Carlson, Mesa, & Rasmussen, 2013). To this end, we seek to better understand student experiences in successful Calculus courses by answering the question, how do students in successful Calculus programs talk about their instructors?

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17158

Students Talk Paper.pdf (113 kB)
Paper

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May 4th, 12:00 PM May 4th, 2:00 PM

How Calculus Students at Successful Programs Talk About Their Instructors

Portland State University

Over the past decade, numerous reports point to the need for national efforts to increase the number of students pursuing and professionals with degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields (see for example NSB, 2007; PCAST, 2012; Thomasian, 2011). According to the PCAST report (2012) increasing the retention rate of the students who enter college intending to major in a STEM field has the potential to significantly decrease the gap between the number of STEM degrees produced and the projected number of STEM degrees needed to sustain the United States position in the global market. While there are many reasons students leave STEM fields, there is a growing body of research that suggests that intending STEM students are switching out of STEM fields due to experiences in their introductory mathematics courses (Ellis, Kelton, & Rasmussen, 2014; PCAST, 2012; Rasmussen & Ellis, 2013), including experiencing poor instruction (Bressoud, Mesa, & Rasmussen, 2015; Seymour & Hewitt, 1997). In the United States each year over 300,000 students enroll in tertiary Calculus, many of which are just beginning their post- secondary education (Blair, Kirkman, Maxwell, 2013; Bressoud, Carlson, Mesa, & Rasmussen, 2013). To this end, we seek to better understand student experiences in successful Calculus courses by answering the question, how do students in successful Calculus programs talk about their instructors?